Home > Education, Latino/Hispanic, Omaha Public Schools, Sagrario "Charo" Rangel, South Omaha > Giving back and moving Forward at heart of Sagrario “Charo” Rangel’s life

Giving back and moving Forward at heart of Sagrario “Charo” Rangel’s life


Giving back and moving forward at heart of Sagrario “Charo” Rangel’s life

©by Leo Adam Biga

Originally appeared in El Perico

 

A strong work ethic and the value of a good education are two enduring lessons Sagrario “Charo” Rangel carries from her Mexican immigrant parents.

Now in her 25th year with the Omaha Public Schools, the South Omaha native and South High graduate started as a secretary before earning her bachelor’s degree and becoming a classroom teacher. She then went on to obtain her master’s and today is an Educational Accountability Office administrator.

Her work puts her in close contact with Latino youths and families through the Grassroots Leadership Development Program, Bridge to Success and the Latino Academic Achievement Council. She serves as OPS spokesperson on KePadre and Radio Lobo Spanish language stations. Her various efforts brought her the 2010 Heartland Latino Leadership Conference Education award.

“It was a very humbling experience,” she says of the honor. “It inspires me. It tells me I’m doing the right thing and it just gives me motivation to continue.”

She admits she never thought much about higher education or professional development as a young woman. She did, however, graduate from a business school. When OPS needed a bilingual secretary she filled the post.

Later, as a bilingual liaison, Rangel urged students to attend four-year colleges but didn’t feel right not having gone herself. With her colleagues nudging her to broaden her horizons, she decided to act.

“I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by people that believed in me and thought I could aspire to be more,” she says. “They encouraged me and inspired me and motivated me to continue on to college.”

She juggled school with being a mother, a wife and a full-time employee. She commuted from Omaha, first to Peru State College, then Concordia University, and finally Doane College.

“There were times when it was very difficult,” says the former Charo Vacquez. “But I learned from my parents you never give up, you work hard, and you do what you need to do. Those are some strong values and beliefs I carry with me today.”

Her husband’s continued his vocational education and her daughter excels in school.

“I would not have been able to do any of this without the support of my husband and my daughter. There were times when all three of us were at the table doing our homework.”

Classroom teaching fulfilled her.

“It was life-altering for me,” she says. “Our classroom was truly like a family, so what affected one affected all of us.”

Though gut-wrenching to leave the classroom, the prospect of having a greater impact convinced her to enter educational administration.

She says, “There was an opportunity to do some positive things in the community, to really make some changes, and be a part of the process and the team.”

Rangel appreciates now being invited to the decision-making table as a peer leader.

“There’s few Latinos in administrative positions in the Omaha Public Schools and nationwide,” she says. “I love the opportunity to work more with the community and to make more of a difference. It’s a passion I have to help the students and families in our community.”

Her own example, she says, is a lesson to students that “yes you can — don’t give up on yourself. I show my students that if you work hard you will see the rewards.” She enjoys being a mentor to others. It’s her way of “giving back” all that she’s been given.

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