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In a Western state of mind II

September 13, 2016 Leave a comment

In a Western state of mind II

©by Leo Adam Biga

 

As a cinephile, I consider myself a connoisseur of certain genres, especially the Western. Like a lot of film buffs I sometimes make the mistake of thinking I’ve seen all the good films there are to see in a particular genre, in this case the Western, when I really ought to know better. I mean, in my lifetime I have seen my share of films of all types, including a good many Westerns, but my conceit can easily make me forget what I know to be the truth – that a whole lot of Westerns have come down the trail from the advent of motion pictures through today. Many hundreds of them. And while I have seen a couple hundred, that leaves a big number I still need to discover. This reality was impressed upon me the last few days when I viewed for the first time three fine Westerns. The first of these, “The Furies,” is one I have long been aware of and even seen bits and pieces of over the years. But Saturday was the first time I sat down to watch the film from beginning to end and I must say it more than lived up to its reputation. The 1950 black and white classic directed by Anthony Mann stars Barbara Stanwyck, Walter Huston, Wendell Corey, Gilbert Roland, Judith Anderson and Thomas Gomez. In this Shakespearean-inspired drama, Huston plays a feudal land baron whose only daughter has an unhealthy love turned hate for her father after she does something terribly wrong to his caddish new wife and he takes out his blood lust revenge against his daughter’s lifelong friend. The story is replete with patricide, corruption, racism, misogyny and betrayal.

 

 

 

 

Mann brought complex psychological themes to his Westerns and while his films don’t always hold up to the deep currents they tread, they do work on many levels. His films also anticipate the work of later Western directors such as Sam Peckinpah in their anti-heroic protagonists, ambivalent morality and uncompromising violence. As usual, Mann displays his gift for juxtaposing characters with exterior landscapes through stark visuals that poetically, dramatically frame men and women against their physical environment to emphasize humans at war with their own natures and with their surroundings.

 

The Furies (1950 film) movie scenes

“The Furies”

 

I had never even heard of, much less seen, the next two Westerns in my private cinema epiphany. “Man from Del Rio” (1956) stars Anthony Quinn and Katy Jurado in a gem of a story directed by Harry Horner, an Oscar-winning production designer who also directed for television and helmed a few features as well. The movie continually sets us up for seeming cliched story-lines and plot twists but nearly always surprises with unconventional choices. Quinn plays a lonely, roaming Mexican gunman out to avenge an old wound. When he rids a town of three bad men he takes the job of sheriff thinking its residents will embrace him, only to learn his trade and his ethnicity make him persona non grata. He is an outcast who cannot find inner peace because he’s invested his entire self-worth on his fast draw and steely resolve. The film’s showdown at the end is reminiscent of many others but only up to a point because, as before, it overturns our expectations. Quinn’s character has suffered an injury rendering his shooting hand useless and yet he still faces off with his nemesis on main street and manages to prevail without a shot being fired because he’s
learned to love himself and to trust his strength of character. His walk in that climactic duel is a piece of pure cinema in the determined way he moves and in the confident way he removes bandages from his injured wrist. It is a walk of sinister grace and quiet bravado.

Quinn gives one of his more subdued, nuanced performances. Horner makes great use of the backlot sets and lets the story build gradually. The black and white photography is suitably austere for this simple story of deep stirrings.

 

“Man from Del Rio”

 

But the best discovery of all in my Western marathon has to be “Day of the Outlaw.” It is another black and white film, this time from the late 1950s (1959 to be precise), but it is far from being just another film. From the enigmatic opening title sequence to the ambivalent ending, it is a work of high aesthetics that compares favorably with much better known and more heralded Westerns. Director Andre de Toth made a lot of Westerns but this is the only one of his I have seen and after viewing it I will eagerly seek out more of his work. Several elements distinguish “Day of the Outlaw” from routine Western programmers: first, the story unfolds in the winter and de Toth and his cast and crew traveled to the American northwest to make the film on location in the wilds of Oregon; the film opens with two men on horseback in high country snow approaching a wagon on a spread filled with barbed wire; the taller man in the saddle, Robert Ryan, expresses to his riding companion, Nehemiah Persoff, a powerful disdain for wire fences and for the men who put them up. Persoff openly questions if it’s one man in particular he hates and if he’s riding into town to kill that man or to steal his wife. That opening couple minutes establishes much of what follows: a bleak, harsh wintertime landscape in the middle of nowhere; and Ryan’s principled but corrupt free range character holding a grudge against farmers who erect fences and harboring a particular hate for one man whose wife, played by Tina Louise, he also lusts after. Once Ryan and Persoff arrive in the isolated town of Bitters the story goes along in somewhat predictable fashion for a time as Ryan and Louise’s husband appear fated to confront one another in a deadly conflict that Ryan will surely win. Louise will do anything to spare her husband but Ryan will not be denied the satisfaction of killing the man who stands in the way of his freedom and of the woman he wants. But then the story takes a completely different turn when, out of nowhere, a band of evil men led by a disgraced former cavalry officer played by Burl Ives, who has the stain of a massacre he ordered on his black heart, seek refuge in town. They are thieves, rapists and murderers on the run from an Army detachment in hot pursuit. The outlaws proceed to terrorize the inhabitants and this changes the balance of everything, as Ryan becomes the hero who tries to keep harm from coming to the residents. He bargains with Ives, whom he recognizes himself in, for their lives and eventually leads the outlaws out of town on the ruse that he knows a way through the mountains to escape their Army pursuers. What Ives’ men don’t know is that he is dying and Ryan is taking him and the others on a trek from which he expects no one will survive. He is sacrificing everything so that the town may be rid of this plague. It is a redemption story without a hint of sentimentality, too. As Ryan explains to Louise before he leaves, he’s doing it for himself and for his own immortal soul and to lead bad people away from good people. He also convinces Ives that it’s better to die with some dignity and on his own terms rather than be responsible for another massacre and be captured or killed in a shootout with the Army.

 

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“Day of the Outlaw”

 

The ending sequences are a great combination of location shooting in harsh conditions and realistic soundstage atmospherics. In this fatalistic story, Ryan doesn’t expect to come of the journey alive and in fact he tells Ives mid-journey that he doesn’t expect any of them will make it. On the other hand, Ryan’s character has the advantage of knowing the territory and surviving its weather, and even though outnumbered seven to one at the start, one by one the outlaws begin falling victim to the elements or to their own avarice.

Director de Toth, whether because of budget constraints or aesthetic reasons, frames much of the action at a distance, in medium or long shot, and makes great use of negative space, all of which enhances the sense of dread, loneliness, isolation and suspense that this movie elicits. Because of the set up involving a small group of people trapped in a frozen environment and preyed on by violent invader, the film, though a Western, plays very much like “The Thing” or “30 Days of Night” in terms of tone, just as it’s also reminiscent of similarly themed Westerns such as “Rio Bravo” and “Firecreek.”

The Ryan character has the moral ambiguity of so many Western anti-heroes of that era and of subsequent eras, thus reflecting the harsh attitudes of post-World War II America that also informed film noir.

Yes, I love Westerns. The geography, history and mythology bound up in them allow film artists to apply all manner of meanings and issues to these vast archetypal landscapes. The more I explore the genre, the more richness I find. Silent features with Harry Carey. Serials. B-oaters. Western comedies. The long reign of TV Westerns as the dominant category of episodic dramatic series. Singing cowboys. John Ford and Howard Hawks classics spanning the Golden Age of the old studio system through the dawn of the New Hollywood. John Wayne and Gary Cooper becoming the faces of the American Western. The two great Western franchises of the 1950s – Anthony Mann’s collaboration with James Stewart and Budd Boetticher’s collaboration with Randolph Scott. The idiosyncratic Westerns of Sam Peckinpah. Sergio Leone’s spaghetti Westerns and the emergence of Clint Eastwood as the new face of the Old West. Monte Hellman’s mid-1960s revisionist Westerns with Jack Nicholson. Robert Altman re-imagining the Western in “McCabe and Mrs. Miller.” The rise of Clint Eastwood as the new face of the Western anti-hero. A Western, “Unforgiven,” finally winning the Best Picture Oscar. The great TV Western mini-series “Lonesome Dove” and “Broken Trail.” The new realism of HBO’s “Deadwood.” The faithful adaptation of Omaha native Ron Hansen’s novel “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.’ The remakes of “True Grit,” “3:10 to Yuma” and, now, “The Magnificent Seven.”

There was a time when the Western was considered dead, but it’s never gone away and it’s pretty clear by now that it never will. Filmmakers will continue finding ways to reinvent and reinvigorate this time honored genre whose interpretations and variations are as wide open as the Great Plains and the American West. Look for more dispatches from my Western cinema adventures and discoveries.

NOTE: The three Westerns that motivated this post were all viewed for free and in their entirety on YouTube. There are short ads built in with some but not all. I am finding an amazingly rich pool of not only Westerns but films of all genres and types available for free on the Web. Last night I thoroughly enjoyed “A Thousand Clowns,” a mid 1960s film that was part of the American New Wave that proceeded the New Hollywood. Watch for my post about, too.

 

Come to Alexander Payne expert Leo Adam Biga’s Sept. 21 book talk-signing “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film”

September 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Come to Alexander Payne expert Leo Adam Biga’s Sept. 21 book talk-signing: “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” at KANEKO-UNO Creativity Library

Come to this relaxed book talk and signing by your friendly neighborhood Alexander Payne expert, Leo Adam Biga, the author of “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film.” My passion project and labor of love is a must-read for movie buffs and fans. I will be selling and signing copies of the new edition before and after my 7 p.m. talk at the KANEKO-UNO Creativity Library, 12th and Jones Streets, in the Old Market, on Wednesday, September 21.

The book sells for $25.95, plus tax. Available via Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kindle and at select book stores and gift shops.

My informal presentation will offer insights into the Oscar-winning writer-director’s creative process gleaned from 20 years of interviewing and covering the filmmaker. The book is a collection of my extensive journalism about Payne and his work. I will also take questions from the audience.

Strong praise for “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film”–

“This is without question the single best study of Alexander Payne’s films, as well as the filmmaker himself and his filmmaking process. In charting the first two decades of Payne’s remarkable career, Leo Adam Biga pieces together an indelible portrait of an independent American artist, and one that’s conveyed largely in the filmmaker’s own words. This is an invaluable contribution to film history and criticism – and a sheer pleasure to read as well.” – Thomas Schatz, Film scholar and author (“The Genius of the System”)

As many of you know, I am an Omaha author-journalist-blogger who often writes about film. In 2012 I turned my in-depth reporting about the celebrated filmmaker from Omaha into “His Journey in Film.”It is the most comprehensive study of Payne’s cinema career and work anywhere. Its collection of articles and essays is based on interviews I conducted with Payne and with many of his key collaborators. The new edition is releasing this fall through River Junction Press in Omaha and features expanded and enhanced content, including a Discussion Guide with Index. It makes a great resource for film buffs, critics, filmmakers, educators and students as well as more casual film fans who want a handy Payne primer and trivia goldmine.

 

FINAL FRONT COVER 6-28-16

The book is updated and current through Payne’s “Nebraska” and “Downsizing” projects.

“Downsizing’s” (2017) epic, tragicomic tale tackles big ideas having to do with pressing world crises and universal human conflicts. The story’s imagined solution to ever depleted world resources is downsizing human beings to a fraction of normal size, thus decreasing mankind’s footprint on planet Earth. Only the reduction experience doesn’t quite go the way that Paul, the Everyman hero played by Matt Damon, envisioned. We go down the rabbit hole of this dark wonderland with Matt into a mind-blowing, soul-stirring, heart-breaking and ultimately inspiring odyssey that traverses everything from geo-political intrigue to classism and racism to human trafficking to love.

The adventure immerses us into new worlds that may represent the new dawn of man. Payne and his collaborators have traveled the globe to make an ambitious film shooting in multiple countries and starring an international cast. It promises to be a cinematic experience filled with spectacle, pathos and satire, yet never losing touch with human intimacy. Every Payne film is about a physical, emotional, intellectual journey. The stakes for the journey Paul takes in “Downsizing” are high because, unbeknownst to Paul, humanity’s future rests on his actions.

Payne and his film should get lots of attention when it releases next year.

“His Journey in Film” takes you deep inside the creative process of this world cinema artist and follows the arc of his filmmaking journey over a 20-year span, when he went from brash indie newcomer to mature, consummate veteran. Along the way, he’s made a handful of the best reviewed American films of the past two decades and his movies have garnered many top honors at festivals and at the Independent Spirit Awards, the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards.

This is a must-get book for Nebraskans who want to know how this native son has arrived at rarefied heights and in the company of legends. Nebraskans love the fact that through all of Payne’s remarkable success, he has remained rooted to this place. There is much more to come from him and much more to be said about his work. But for now “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” is the definitive word on his journey and output.

Look for announcements about future Biga book talks-signings at:

https://leoadambiga.com/

https://www.facebook.com/LeoAdamBiga/

https://www.facebook.com/AlexanderPayneExpert/?fref=ts

Harmonious, luminescent pairing of art – “Prayer” and “Share” – on exhibit at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery

September 12, 2016 Leave a comment

A harmonious, luminescent pairing of art called “Prayer” and “Share” on exhibition at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery through October 10.

The show closes the 2016 ArtLoft Gallery season with an inspired “Amen.”

Pamela Jo Berry explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs. Katie Cramer explores grace and fellowship through vessels. It is an art show that feeds the spirit and nurtures the soul. A display of beautiful aesthetics and inspiring intentions by two artists in touch with their spiritual dimensions. 

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists and their heartfelt art. It is a pairing made in Heaven.

The exhibition continues through October 10.  

Gallery hours are the same as the Mill: Wed. through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm; Sunday, 10 am to 3 pm. Sundays feature a Farmers Market.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

 

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Artist Statement by Pamela Jo Berry for “Prayer”:
“Prayer is that down to earth conversation we have with God when we realize we are not in control and we need … want to know that God… someone greater than us is out there… right here waiting to help us with our needs, our mistakes, our direction , our provision… and is ready to give a miracle if necessary. Prayer is that sacred moment when we sit in silence… after going over every scenario with God…. exhausted, we surrender and finally listen willingly for our answers…our direction… our next step in this life. Prayer is what we do for others when we know we cannot help with what they are crying out for. Prayer is the thank you and praise we give to God for the blessings and miracles we see in our lives and the lives of others…each day. It could be a smile, a hug, a healing…favor or something that comes out of the blue to save our lives. Prayer is a community standing for one person to be healed… and it is one person standing for healing in a community without hope. Prayer can be as loud as shouting for help and as quiet as a whisper of praise or as silent as a tear of realization that we are heard. Prayer is as simple as saying ‘God are you there?'”
Pamela’s Artist Bio:
Pamela Jo Berry …. She is an artist… mixed media/ photographic. She is a writer/poet. For the last six years she has organized the North Omaha Summer Arts. She is an Omaha Native. Pamela Jo is the mother of Jesse Berry and Beaufield Berry Fisher. And she is the Gemma (grandmother) of Shine Avett Fisher… her little grandson.

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Artist Statement by Katie Cramer for “Share”
Food is the most common and diverse ways to bring people together. Sharing it is meaningful culturally and historically throughout all regions of the world. I view pottery as vessels that share not only food, but the conversation and company that occurs. Many of these items are meant to be viewed as a set. The surface and aesthetic qualities from piece to piece is completely different, just like the people sharing the experience. The fact that they are placed in the same setting is what makes them come together.
 
Katie’s Artist Bio:
Katie Cramer was born and raised in Omaha. She took her first summer pottery class when she was 10 years old and completely fell in love with clay and the potter’s wheel. Her experience at Omaha North High School heightened this adoration for ceramics and pushed her to attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she is in the process of earning her Bachelor’s of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Ceramics. She is currently a 3rd year student with full intentions of pursuing ceramics as a profession.

 

 

“Prayer” and “Share” art exhibition at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery offers inspired “Amen”: Now through October 10

September 6, 2016 Leave a comment

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If you didn’t make it to the opening for the new exhibition at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery over Labor Day weekend, no worries – you have until October 10.

“Prayer” and “Share” at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery closes the 2016 ArtLoft Gallery season with an inspired “Amen.”

Pamela explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs. Katie explores grace and fellowship through vessels.

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists and their heartfelt art. It is a pairing made in Heaven.

The exhibition continues through October 10.  

Gallery hours are the same as the Mill: Wed. through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm; Sunday, 10 am to 3 pm. Sundays feature a Farmers Market.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

 

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Katie and Pamela

 

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The artists with Florence Mill ArtLoft director Linda Meigs

Two-person art show: “Prayer” by Pamela Jo Berry & “Share” by Katie Cramer – Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery

September 1, 2016 Leave a comment

Two-person art show: “Prayer” by Pamela Jo Berry & “Share” by Katie Cramer – Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery, Sept. 3 to Oct. 10

“Prayer  and Share” closes the 2016 ArtLoft season with an inspired “Amen.”
“Prayer” by Pamela Jo Berry & “Share” by Katie Cramer.

Pamela explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs.
Katie explores grace and fellowship through vessels.

Artists reception 1:30 to 4:30 pm this Saturday, September 3.

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists showing together for the first time. Join us for refreshments, good spirits and heartfelt art.

The exhibition runs through October 10.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

Pamela Jo Berry & Katie Cramer at Florence Mill ArtLoft: Saturday, Sept 3, 1:30-4:30

Florence Mill ArtLoft Reception for Artists
Pamela Jo Berry and Katie Cramer
This Saturday September 3…1:30-4:30 pm

“PRAYER” by Pamela Jo Berry
“SHARE” by Katie Cramer

We close the 2016 ArtLoft season with an inspired “Amen.”Pamela Jo Berry explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs.Katie Cramer explores grace and fellowship through vessels.

Please join us for refreshments, good spirits and heartfelt art.

The exhibition runs through October 10.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

Top: “Teapot” by Katie Cramer
Below: “Cross1” by Pamela Jo Berry

Passing the torch at the Dundee Dell

August 29, 2016 Leave a comment

I have always been partial to the fish and chips served up at the Dundee Dell. The old line Omaha pub has a loyal following for its grub and spirits and for its ultra casual vibe. There’s something traditional and classic about the way it looks and feels and does things. So when I got the assignment from Food & Spirits Magazine (http://fsmomaha.com/) to do this piece on the recent ownership change at the Dell I was more than happy to accept because I was curious to meet the man who’s headed the place for the last three decades, Pat Goebel, as well as the man he’s passed the torch to, Greg Lindberg. Both gentlemen have years of experience in the food business. Goebel inherited a legacy in the Dell. Lindberg made his name and success as the entrepeneur who brought fresh seafood to Omaha to a whole new level through his Absolutely Fresh Seafood markest and Bailey’s and Shucks restaurants. Selling the Dell to someone as experienced as Lindberg eases Goebel’s mind that he’s leaving it in good hands and Lindberg is respectful enough of what Goebel created there that he’s asked Goebel to help smooth the transition. Goebel’s pleased to do just that. It’s been a spell since I’ve dined and hung out at the Dell and after meeting the men and learning how passionate they are about the place what it means to them I’m eager to renew my own relationship with it. You can bet I’ll order the fish and chips and even though I really don’t imbibe I may break down  just to sample one of those aged Scotches the joint takes pride in. Oh, and on some other visit I have to try the hot pastrami sandwich that both Goebel and Lindberg recommended.

 

The fish and chips at Dundee Dell are crisp and delicious.

 

Passing the torch at the Dundee Dell

©by Leo Adam Biga

Appearing in the August 2016 issue of Food & Spirits Magazine (http://fsmomaha.com/)

 

In the wake of Piccolo’s closing, leaving Omaha one less signature Italian steakhouse, the Bohemian Cafe announced it would serve its last Czech specialties in September. So when rumors surfaced Pat Goebel was selling the city’s oldest pub, the Dundee Dell, local diners and imbibers alike quaked at the thought of some dillitante swooping in and ruining a good thing.

Fears were allayed when news got out the Dell was purchased by veteran Omaha restauranteur and wholesale food maven Greg Lindberg. The midtown landmark has joined his Absolutely Fresh Seafood, Shucks Fish House and Oyster Bar and Baileys family of businesses.

Since taking over last spring, with Goebel staying on to ease the transition at Lindberg’s request, the new owner’s made it known to devotees the magic that makes the Dell won’t change.

Lindberg, who often bent an elbow at its old 50th and Dodge location and followed it to its current 50th and Underwood site, appreciates what he’s inherited when he calls the homey  establishment an “icon and institution.”

“The pressure I feel is to not screw it up, because it is the Dundee Dell,” Lindberg said. “My witnesses or judges are the loyal customers and employees.”

He said being the steward of a legacy that goes back to 1934, when it started as a Jewish delicatessen, then went through a steakhouse phase, before tuning pub, is a “labor of love.” He’s also quick to add, “I believe I can make money with this. I think I can make it a good business and a fun place for me to be. I’m doing this because I want to do this.” There’s also a deeper reason that motivated him to buy the Dell – he didn’t want to see it shuttered the way so many historic restaurants have and chance a franchise opening in its place.

“I believe in small business,” he said. That belief goes back to his father who championed buying on main street as publisher of newspapers in Sergeant and West Point, Nebraska.

By the time Lindberg operated his own ventures, he saw too many mom-and-pops go under.

“I was selling fish to all these restaurants owned by hard working people trying to feed their families. The chains kept moving in and kicking these people out. That sucked, that is not the way I want my town to be, so I fight back.”

 

Photo of Greg Lindberg

Greg Lindberg

 

Lindberg admires that Goebel enjoyed a long run (he bought it in 1989) and “kept the vibe, the spirit” while giving it “a breath of fresh air” upon moving to its new digs in 2000. Lindberg’s added new systems, fresh carpeting and other overdue updates to provide “new energy” and “get it shiny,” but he’s kept most everything else the same. That includes the famous fish and chips and the hot pastrami sandwich. Holdover executive chef Mary Tomes is introducing new seafood and traditional English pub items. The Dell’s epic collection of Scotch varietals is being curated to further brand the Dell as a niche neighborhood joint where you can get certain scotches you can’t anywhere else.

Lindberg said his familiarity with Scotch was limited to drinking it, but he’s learning from Goebel, a bonafide connoisseur. Goebel’s vast store of spirits knowledge is not the only reason Lindberg asked he remain in-house awhile.

“A lot of the Dell is between his ears, quite frankly. Plus, he’s the face of the Dell.”

Lindberg’s getting ample face time with Dundee regulars. “Whatever the politically correct term is for people with money and education, well, they’re here,” he said, “and that’s cool, I like it.” The Dell can appeal to an upscale clientele looking for a relaxed setting, but looking at Dundee’s mostly gourmet eateries, it fills the inexpensive pub niche otherwise missing.

He’s learned things since starting his first business in 1979.

“A lot of times in my life it’s been knowing what not to do. I have ideas from here to the Interstate. single-spaced. I’m a list guy.

I’ve kept my last two phones and computers because they have so many lists and they don’t talk to each other. There’s some good ideas in there, but you can’t do everything.”

Many eateries go awry, he said, by “trying to be all things to all people – too many things on the menu.” “Ideally,” he said, “I’d shave off a third of any menu.”

He believes the front and back of the house are only as good as the people working them. He was impressed enough by Goebel’s tight-knit corps that he’s kept the entire staff intact.

“We haven’t gotten rid of anybody.”

“I could not be more pleased,” Goebel said. “It really is family.

So many of our staff have been here 10 years-plus. We take care of our people, we support each other. If somebody’s having a rough spot, we gather around and help them through it. If there’s a wedding or a new baby’s born, we all celebrate.”

Lindberg isn’t messing with a good thing. “Everybody talks about their place is family,” he said. “This is the real deal. There’s a lot of amazing stories about what Pat’s done for these people. If you’ve got good people, you can do anything, – I believe that in my soul. I’ve done my best to surround myself with talented, hard working people. I actually like ’em and they tend to like me.” Yes, running a business comes with hassles, but “good people take most of those away from you,” he said.

Goebel feels he’s leaving his people and place in good hands.

“Greg and I really see eye-to-eye on things. I wanted to find       somebody who’s vested in the legacy, in the tradition, in the Dundee Dell, and wanted to maintain that going forward, and I found that in Greg. I wouldn’t have done it any other way. I’m very invested emotionally here. I will always be. But it’s time for me to pass the torch.

“This thing needs to be respected and honored and cherished. It’s not just another part of a large operation. I mean, do we really need another Applebees? Does it make Omaha better? The Dundee Dell does make Omaha better.”

 

 

 

Lindberg said the timing was right. The Dell took a hit from extended street construction a few years ago that made accessing it a pain. Business further  lagged this last year. When he heard Goebel was seeking a buyer, he contacted him to discuss terms and discovered the depths of the struggles.

“It got rough. It was spiraling down. Staff were a little beat down over lack of money to fix things. The way I saw it,” Lindberg said, “if I didn’t do it, this thing was going to fall. It was close.”

Besides not wanting the Dell be another Omaha eatery casualty, taking on a new challenge is just what he needed.

“I’ve just been having a good time with Shucks and Bailey’s and Absolutely Fresh for decades. It wasn’t always fun, but it has been for quite some time. This has reenergized me. I don’t have to work, but I like it. I’m 61-years old, I’ve been doing this for 37 years. I’ve been saving money – not for the first 12 or so – but I’ve been saving money ever since. I’d be fine. I could retire.

“But then what?”

Ever the entrepreneur, Lindberg needs the rush that comes with business risk and reward. Then there’s the symmetry of it.

“I bought it from Pat, who had it for 27 years. He bought it from Neil Everett, who had it for 27 years. That’s Haley’s comet weird.”

Lindberg’s not sure he’ll make it  27 years himself, which would be 2043, but he’s happy to settle for another milestone.

“It will be a hundred years old in 2034. I can make it that long.”

Visit http://www.dundeedell.com.

‘Downsizing’ may elevate filmmaker to new heights; ‘Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film’ your guide to his cinema universe

August 28, 2016 Leave a comment

‘Downsizing’ may elevate filmmaker to new heights

‘Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film’ your guide to his cinema universe

©by Leo Adam Biga

Author of “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film”

 

The epic tragicomic tale told in Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing” (2017) tackles big ideas having to do with pressing world crises and universal, age-old human conflicts. The story’s imagined solution to ever depleted world resources is downsizing human beings to a fraction of normal size, thus decreasing mankind’s footprint on planet Earth. Only the reduction experience doesn’t quite go the way that Paul, the Everyman hero played by Matt Damon, envisioned. We go down the rabbit hole of this dark wonderland with Matt into a mind-blowing, soul-stirring, heart-breaking and ultimately inspiring odyssey that traverses everything from geo-political intrigue to classism and racism to human trafficking to love. The adventure takes us into new worlds that may or may not be the salvation of civilization but that just may be, for better or worse, the new dawn of man. Payne and his collaborators have traveled the globe to make an ambitious film shooting in multiple countries and starring an international cast. It promises to be a cinematic experience filled with spectacle, pathos and satire, yet never losing touch with human intimacy. As we know by now, every Payne film is about a physical, emotional, intellectual journey that tests its protagonists with some crucible they must endure in order to reach a new place, literally or metaphorically speaking. The stakes for the journey Paul takes in “Downsizing” are higher than for any journey in Payne’s other films because, unbeknownst to Paul, humanity’s future rests on his actions.

Payne and his film will get lots of attention when it releases mid-t0-late 2017. I think it will be the most talked about American film of the year. If it does resonate strongly enough with audiences it could very well catapult the filmmaker into a new category alongside such names as Tarantino, Scorsese, Cameron, Soderbergh and Nolan. Like their critically acclaimed movies that also become box office hits, Payne’s “Downsizing” may be his first film to not only reach the $100 million gross mark but to pull in well in excess of that number. It may also mark the film that finally wins him a Best Director Oscar. For someone like me who has closely covered Payne for a generation, there is much to anticipate and to report on in the coming year. After writing about the film last winter-spring and not much at all the last few months, I will be ramping up my coverage the remainder of this year through all of next year.

Downsizing - coming in 2017

 

If you admire Payne’s films and want to know what goes into making them, then you will want to follow my reporting. You will also want to get a copy of my book”Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film.” It is updated and current through Payne’s “Nebraska” and “Downsizing” projects. This passion project and labor of love is a must-read for movie buffs and fans. It is your companion guide to understanding his cinema universe. As an author-journalist-blogger, I often write about film and in 2012 I turned my in-depth reporting about Payne into this book. It is the most comprehensive study of his cinema career and work to be found anywhere. Its collection of articles and essays is based on interviews I conducted with Payne and with many of his key collaborators. My new edition is releasing this fall through River Junction Press in Omaha and features expanded and enhanced content, including a Discussion Guide with Index. It makes a great resource for film buffs, critics, filmmakers, educators and students as well as more casual film fans who want a handy Payne primer and trivia goldmine.

“Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” takes you deep inside the creative process of one of the world’s leading cinema artists and follows the arc of his filmmaking journey over a 20-year span, when he went from brash indie newcomer to mature, consummate veteran. Along the way, he’s made a handful of the best reviewed American films of the past two decades and his movies have garnered many top honors at festivals and at the Independent Spirit Awards, the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards.

Available via Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kindle and at select book stores and gift shops.

I will be selling and signing copies of my new edition before and after my 7 p.m. book talk at the KANEKO-UNO Creativity Library, 1111 Jones Street, in the Old Market on Wednesday, September 21.

The book sells for $25.95, plus tax.

My informal presentation will offer insights into the Oscar-winning writer-director’s creative process gleaned from 20 years of interviewing and covering the filmmaker. I will also take questions from the audience.

Strong praise for “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film”

“This is without question the single best study of Alexander Payne’s films, as well as the filmmaker himself and his filmmaking process. In charting the first two decades of Payne’s remarkable career, Leo Adam Biga pieces together an indelible portrait of an independent American artist, and one that’s conveyed largely in the filmmaker’s own words. This is an invaluable contribution to film history and criticism – and a sheer pleasure to read as well.” – Thomas Schatz, Film scholar and author (“The Genius of the System”)

I hope to see you at the KANEKO-UNO Creativity Library. You can let us know you’re coming by linking to the Facebook event page and clicking GOING–

https://www.facebook.com/events/192453694506333/

If you can’t make this event, you’ll have more chances to get a copy signed by me during the fall. Look for announcements about future book talks-signings on my social media platforms:

https://leoadambiga.com/

https://www.facebook.com/LeoAdamBiga/

https://www.facebook.com/AlexanderPayneExpert/?fref=ts

Please remember that “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” makes a great gift for the film and book lover in your life.

It’s a must-get book for Nebraskans who want to know how this celebrated native son has arrived at rarefied heights and in the company of legends. Nebraskans love the fact that through all of Payne’s remarkable success, he has remained rooted to this place. His story will only get larger from here on out and this book is the foundation for appreciating how he has grown and what he has achieved in his first 20 years as a feature filmmaker.

There is much more to come from him and much more to be said about his work. But for now “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” is the definitive word on his creative ourney and output.

 
FINAL FRONT COVER 6-28-16
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