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Cinemateca series trains lens on diverse films and themes

September 13, 2016 2 comments

I am sharing my El Perico story on the remainder of the Cinemateca series at Film Streams, Every two years Latin America motion pictures take center stage during the Cinemateca series that Film Streams hosts with OLLAS, the Office of Latino and Latin American Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The 2016 Cinemateca series held at the Ruth Sokolof Theater at 1340 Mike Fahey Street in North Downtown has a few weeks left. Tuesday nights showcase adult-themed features, including tonight’s showing of “Viva” from Cuba. Sample free food and refreshments related to the country of origin before the show and stick around for the post-screening panel.

NOTE: Tonight’s (Tuesday, September 13) showing of “Viva: is sold out.

NOTE: The Guatemalan film “Ixcanul” that showed earlier in the series is having a special return engagement screening on Friday, September 30.

-PAXP-deijE.gifCheck out the Cinemateca schedule at–

http://www.filmstreams.org/film_series/cinemateca-2016/

 

Cinemateca series trains lens on diverse films and themes

©by Leo Adam Biga

Author of Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film

Originally appeared in El Perico

 

This year’s sampling of Latin American motion pictures in the biennial Cinemateca series at Film Streams is heavy on fiction, though a much anticipated documentary is also featured.

Cinemateca’s been part of Film Streams since the North Downtown art cinema’s 2008 start. This fifth collaboration with the Office of Latino and Latin American Studies (OLLAS) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha includes five feature films for adult audiences and two features for families.

Each adult-themed feature has a single Tuesday night screening at 7, followed by a panel discussion.

Pre-show tapas from local Latino eateries will be served.

The family pics have multiple screening dates and times.

The 2016 curated series presents films from the United States, Cuba, Argentina, Brazil, Spain and Guatemala. The current series already screened the urban Spanish black comedy My Big Night and the indigenous Guatemalan drama Ixcanul.

The remaining schedule is:

September 13

Viva

OLLAS interim director Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado called this 2015 Cuban-Irish co-production “a very beautiful movie,” adding, “I’ve seen Viva twice already but I can’t wait to see it again.” Hector Medina stars as Havana drag club hairdresser Jesus, whose performing dream gets sidetracked when his estranged father shows up. “Viva is a film of multiple story-lines anybody can latch onto, whether the drag culture in Havana, the dynamics of a father and son or the socio-economics of Cuban society in flux. It’s among the best films to come out of Cuba.”

Medina will be Cinemateca’s special guest at the screening.

 

September 20

El Clan

This 2015 Argentine drama is based on the true story of a seemingly typical middle class family operating a large, violent kidnapping ring. Benjamin-Alvarado said, “I like movies based on true stories and I want to see El Clan because it’s going to be wild.”

 

September 27

Los Sures

When originally released in 1984 this documentary about the vital Puerto Rican and Dominican inhabitants of Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood received little fanfare. But since the film’s rediscovery and restoration it’s become an archival treasure and talking point because it captures what the area was like before gentrification displaced minority residents. “It’s kind of this cautionary tale about what’s lost when communities are gentrified,” Benjamin-Alvarado said.

 

September 8,10, 11 and 15

Boy & the World 

This silent, hand-drawn 2013 animated film from Brazil follows a rural boy searching for his father in the big city.

 

September 18 and 22

Habanastation

A privileged boy who gets lost in a Havana slum is befriended by his poor counterpart in this 2011 Cuban live-action film. Benjamin-Alvarado’s colleague at UNO, Steven Torres, said, “Jonathan and I really enjoyed the film. We wanted to bring it to Film Streams before but we couldn’t find a version with English subtitles and the exhibition rights were restricted. We finally worked things out with the director to screen the film with English subtitles. It’s an interesting film from many different standpoints because these two kids come to terms dealing with one another and working together to find solutions as they try to reconcile their very different backgrounds.”

There is free admission to all Habanastation screenings.

Torres said Cinemateca is intentionally diverse  “We always try to include films from different countries and provide a variety of film traditions and genres to tap into different audiences. We try to think in inclusive term with films that might be aesthetically pleasing but might also have some content that could lead to interesting discussion.”

Benjamin-Alvarado said a vetting process winnows more than 100 prospective titles to the final seven. Even when there’s consensus, films are not always available due to rights- licensing issues. He said this year organizers were able to book their top choices. “We have quality films across the board. We think it’s a pretty special series. The audience is going to be in for a treat with each of the films.”

For cinephile Benjamin-Alvarado, Cinemateca represents Film Streams’s “ability to bring to the community the universality of the human experience.” He said, “It may be in a disparate location under very interesting conditions, yet it really breaks down to the essence of who we are as humans. Cinemateca offers people opportunities to explore connections to our shared humanity. These films offer glimpses into different cultures and situations that spark conversation. It’s a celebration of the filmmaking and an exploration into the lives of people we wouldn’t otherwise experience. We find they’re so much like us.” That reflective mirror, he said is “the beauty of film.”

He loves that Cinemateca is a showcase for “the Spanish language” and for “the quality of (Latin American) filmmaking that continues to grow and expand.”

Fillm Streams founder-director Rachel Jacobson said Cinemateca “has been one of our most enduring and fulfilling community partnerships.” She added, “OLLAS not only gets our mission and how to help fulfill it by programming interesting and diverse selections and complementing discussions, they have actually helped to shape the way we program.”

For showtimes and tickets, visit http://www.filmstreams.org.

U.S.-Cuba begin a dance of possible reconciliation


When President Barack Obama announced plans for the United States to begin the process of normalizing relations with Cuba the news reverberated throughout the world.  The two nations were once friends but have officially and often tangibly been antagonists and flat-out enemies for decades due to Cold War tensions that found them on opposite sides of the doctrinal divide.  Their respective governments have remained bitter foes despite the passage of time and despite the fact the two countries are geographically close neighbors with shared history, culture, and interests.  The prospect of letting bygones be bygones has deep import for people with a vested interest, personal and/or professional, in seeing relations renewed.  Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado, a sociology professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, is one of those people. He’s not Cuban but he’s made the study of Cuba, where he’s traveled extensively, a big part of his academic career.  He’s a strong advocate for the U.S.-Cuba letting go of the past and finding a way forward together.  Lazaro Spindola is another person for whom the prospect of renewed relations means a, lot but this native of Cuba is cautious and downright skeptical when it comes to trusting Cuba to live up to its part of any diplomatic measures that encourage cooperation and reconiliation.  My El Perico story was originally published a couple months ago in the flush of this international development.  The piece provides a micro look at a loggershead issue that may finally move beyond vitriol and impasse to a sustainable, quid-pro-quo relationship based on mutual respect.  Only time will tell.
U.S.-Cuba begin a dance of possible reconciliation
©by Leo Adam Biga
Originally appeared in El Perico

 

President Barack Obama’s announcement the U.S. is moving to normalize relations with Cuba holds promise for healing between conflicting nations that were once friends.

Since breaking diplomatic relations in 1961, the United States and Cuba have tread a cycle of acrimony and treachery. These Cold War antagonists became distant enemies despite their close proximity. In response to perceived human rights abuses, America enacted economic sanctions that blocked commerce. Cuba retaliated by jailing dissidents and expelling “undesirables.”

An American embargo cut-off a much-prized Cuban export to the U.S. – cigars (except those smuggled in) – and denied Cubans U.S. goods and investments. Cuban exiles bitter over losing land and businesses to Fidel Castro’s communist regime generally oppose U.S. concessions. However, most Cuban-Americans support the countries doing business together, says University of Nebraska at Omaha political science professor Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado. Neb.’s small exile community reflects the idealogical-generational divide among this population, with many younger, liberal Cubans favoring restored relations and many older, conservative Cubans resisting it.

Stalemate critics have long contended the countries share too many mutual interests to not have full relations. Benjamin-Alvarado lauded the intermediary role Pope Francis and the Vatican played in bringing the two sides together for diplomatic talks that broke the impasse.

Renewal of natural geopolitical-cultural-historic ties may signal a move past angry rhetoric and punitive policy to find conditional avenues for resuming free travel and trade. It won’t come easy, though.

“The fact is we didn’t have to become the type of enemies we were, but we have been, and so that’s going to take some work,” Benjamin-Alvarado says. “This is a clear indicator to me it’s always been possible and that it’s been a choice we’ve made as opposed to something we couldn’t avoid.”

 

He echoes Obama in saying this new approach is an admission that America’s policy of isolating and economically strangling Cuba failed and that Cuba’s made positive changes.

“Cuba’s changed remarkably in the last 20 years. They’ve transitioned from Fidel to Raul, they’ve reintroduced private property and the ability of individuals to serve as owners of small businesses, they’ve given people more economic independence. Does that mean they’re going to have more political freedoms and liberties? I’m not exactly sure…but the fact is change is afoot, and I think by making changes in tandem with the Cubans we’ll begin to see that happening.”

Nebraska Latino American Commission executive director Lazaro Spindola is a skeptic.

“Diplomacy will obviously have a better chance with this new approach,” says Spindola, who was born in Cuba and fled with his family in 1961 at age 9. “On the other hand, free trade is a very arbitrary definition, and all I see is free flow of American dollars to Cuba – by way of remittances or purchasing Cuban goods. As far as free travel, I see the same one-sided approach of free travel from the United States to Cuba but not from Cuba to the U.S.”

He’s willing to support restored relations “provided there is a mutual concession of benefits that favor the Cuban people,” adding, “”If the Cuban government is willing to yield some ground, I would be willing to meet halfway. Compromise is the base of democracy.”

Some view Cuba’s recent release of political prisoners as a sign it is serious about doing the right thing. Spindola cautions that regimes like Cuba’s “have a knack for softening or hardening relations with other countries depending on their political convenience.” He fears renewed trade might provide Cuba “with an injection of resources and energy that could further delay positive reforms.”

He and Benjamin-Alvarado agree renewed trade with Cuba could benefit the Neb. ag industry, though Spindola questions Cuba’s capacity to live up to its end of any deals.

What happens going forward, Benjamin-Alvarado says, “is a dance” where each side looks to the other for concessions.

“At the end of the day it’s going to have play out through Congress, The Cuban government, in order to have full normalization of relations with the United States, has to right now subject itself, unless the law changes, to certain provisions of U.S. law contained in the Helms-Burton Act. It says essentially the Castro brothers have to be out of the government, there have to be free and fair elections, there must be a free and open market economy and other requirements must be met.

“I don’t see this law being overturned anytime soon and so that will slow the process of a full normalization, but there is still a lot of room the Cubans could operate under in order to facilitate trade.”

Meanwhile, Obama may use executive action to speed things along as ambassadors lay the groundwork for more exchanges.

“The president will have the ability to kind of tailor certain interactions,” he says, “Having embassies where we can have an actual voice and opportunity to directly interact on an ongoing basis will help to establish a baseline and foundation for better relations across the board.”

Finding a new normal falls to new leadership in 2017, when Raul Castro is to step down and Obama’s elected successor takes office. Benjamin-Alvarado says whoever inherits this reunification needs to proceed in a fair and bilateral way.

“It’s going to take a lot more for them to trust us. I mean, we’ve been trying to screw them for the last 54 years and now all of a sudden we’re friends. I think that trust is a combination of confidence and reliability. But it will take time. They have to have confidence in us we’re going to be an honest broker with them, that just as they’re going to be transparent we’re going to be transparent, and that we’re going to be above board and open in our objectives and not try to undermine and engage in subterfuge as we have.

“It has to be an organic process generated by both sides so there isn’t one dictating to the other. It’s going to have to be a measured, step-by-step process that allows both sides to become comfortable with how they function and operate and to develop confidence over time.”

Benjamin-Alvarado, who’s traveled extensively in Cuba and plans going again in the spring, says he will measure progress “by the extent to which the Cubans begin engaging formal U.S. government bodies like the Department of Commerce and the Department of State,” adding, “It’s going to depend on how do we get each other on board and accustomed to how each of us does business, not only in terms of actual trade, but the areas in which we begin to relate to one another as regional partners and neighbors.”

Sports fans like Benjamin-Alvarado also can’t help but wonder what thawed relations might mean for the deep pool of baseball, boxing and track talent in Cuba, many of whose best athletes have defected.

UNO/OLLAS resident expert on Cuban and Latino matters Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado

July 18, 2012 3 comments

Sometimes it’s easy to assume that academics are cloistered away in their ivy towers, isolated from the real world.  That’s certainly not the case with Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado.  The University of Nebraska at Omaha political science professor does his share of research but much of it takes him out of his office, off campus, and out into mainstream of life, whether to the barrios of South Omaha or Cuba, where he’s traveled many times for his research.  I was reminded to post this profile of him I wrote a couple years ago after reading a piece in the local daily about his latest trip to Cuba, this time leading a group of UNO students to help restore a theater there that he hopes becomes a conduit for future arts-cultural exhanges.  In his work he’s just as likely to meet with folks just trying to get by as he is with U.S. and Cuban diplomats and leaders.  He’s even met Castro.

 

 

 

Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado

Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado

 

 

 

UNO/OLLAS resident expert on Cuban and Latino matters Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado

©by Leo Adam Biga

Originally appeared in El Perico

 

For author, researcher, activist and University of Nebraska at Omaha associate professor of political science Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado, political engagement is a birthright.

His mother Romelia marched with Cesar Chavez in the California migrant labor movement. Both his parents know first hand the migrant worker struggle. They also know the empowering change hard work and opportunity can bring.

Benjamin-Alvarado still marvels how his folks made “a hyper speed transition” from their vagabond life hand-picking crops wherever the next harvest was to achieving the American Dream within 20 years. “The day I was born my dad was picking lettuce and the day I graduated from high school he owned his own business and we lived in a really nice house in the suburbs.”

From his mother, who worked on behalf of women’s and Latino rights and as a political campaign volunteer, he learned activism. From his father he learned ambition and determination. As someone who grew up in The Burbs, never having to toil in the fields, Benjamin-Alvarado fully realizes how charmed he’s been to have role models like these.

“To this very day I’m reminded of the lessons and examples presented before me. These were people who prided themselves on what they did. They were people with an incredible sense of dignity and self respect,” he said. “I think what makes things like Cesar Chavez (or his mother) happen is they’re not willing to cede that one iota. They made it very clear that your abuse and subjugation of me will not define me.

“I shutter to think what my forbearers could have done had they had the opportunities I’ve been extended, especially given the incredible work ethic they had. They had no choice but to work hard. It’s only as I’ve gotten older I’ve realized what an incredible legacy and, in turn, responsibility I have to pay it forward. I’m very fortunate to have been able to live and travel all over the world and to be educated in incredible places. My whole thing now is what can I do to make sure others have these opportunities. I really do cherish what I have been granted and I feel an overriding sense of obligation.”

Despite comforts, life at home for he and his brother was unpleasant. Their father was an abusive partner to their mother. The siblings were also misfits in mostly Anglo schools and neighborhoods. To escape, the boys read voraciously. “That was our refuge from all the craziness in our lives. We were really just sponges,” said Jonathan. He did well in school and was enrolled in college when he abruptly left to join the U.S. Navy.

“I think everybody in my family was aghast but i really did it more for purposes of self-preservation and to establish some independence for myself. I needed to leave.”

His 1976-1980 Naval tour fit the bill.

“For me it was just four years of incredible discovery,” he said. “I met for the first time blacks from the northeast and Chicago, kids from the South and the Midwest, other Latinos.  All of that was very interesting to me. I came to appreciate them and their cultures in ways I couldn’t possibly have done so had I stayed sequestered in California, where it’s very insular and you think the world revolves around you.”

Back home he used the G.I. bill to attend ucla, where he said he went from doubting whether he belonged to believing “I’m competitive with the cream of the crop. That realization stunned me. There was no limit at that point. I was in a different world.”

Then an incident he doesn’t like discussing occurred. It took five years to recover from physical and emotional wounds. He eventually earned his bachelor’s degree and did stints at Stanford and Harvard. He earned his master’s at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. While working at its think tank, the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, he began intensive research on Cuba. He’s traveled there 25 times, often spending months per visit. Cuba remains a major focus of his professional activity.

Recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency, he seriously entertained doing clandestine work before deciding he didn’t want to give up his academic freedom. Besides, he said, “I don’t and won’t keep secrets because it gets you into trouble.” Already married and with a child, he opted to complete his doctoral studies at the University of Georgia. He landed major grants for his Cuban research. Along the way he’s become a recognized expert on Cuban energy and foreign policy, authoring one book and editing another on that nation’s energy profile and what it bodes for future cooperation with the West.

A temporary teaching post at Georgia then set him on a new track.

“I had not given the idea of being a classroom instructor much thought prior to that,” he said. “I thought I was going to spend my life as a senior researcher — a wonk. But I got this bug (to teach). I realized almost immediately I like doing this, they like me, this is a good gig. It didn’t feel like I had to work real hard to do it, a lot of it just came naturally, and I had this reservoir to draw on.”

When grant funding dried up he sought a full-time teaching job and picked UNO over several offers, in part for it’s dynamic growth and emerging Latino community. He’s been at UNO 10 years. His Cuba work has continued but in a different way.

Dr. Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado introduces an event speaker“The purposes of my visits have changed dramatically. Initially they were all for conducting basic research, doing lots of interviews on the ground. In the late 1990s I was involved in making some film documentaries for a PBS series. Then I spent five-six years taking students and faculty and people from the community to Cuba.”

Then the U.S. banned academic trips there. His last few visits he’s “been part of high level delegations with former Pentagon and State Department staff. This last one (in November) was with former U.N. Ambassador Thomas Pickering.” In 2006 he met with senior government officials, including Fidel Castro, Raoul Castro, the president of the national assembly and ministers of other government bureaucracies. On these visits he’s there as “technical advisor-resident expert” for debriefings, analysis and reading beyond the rhetoric to decipher what’s really being said through interpreters.

He believes normalized relations only make sense for two nations with such an affinity for each other. Once restrictions are lifted he envisions a Cuban trip with area public and private sector leaders. He and a colleague plan to convene an international conference in Havana, of university presidents from North and South America “to discuss the trajectory of higher education in the 21st century for the Americas.”

His connections helped broker a deal for Nebraska selling ag products to Cuba. Closer to home, he advises government on Latino matters and is active in the Democratic Party. He’d like to see more Latinos active in local politics. A recipient of UNO’s Outstanding Teacher Award, he said the Office of Latino/Latin American Studies at UNO “has been a godsend for me. OLLAS has been central to helping me live out what I do in my community. There’s an element of it that is very personal. When we founded OLLAS we intentionally created something that would have a community base and make the community a part of what we do. We want our work to be not only politically but socially relevant. That’s been the basis for the outreach projects we’ve undertaken.”

Recent projects include reports on immigration and Latino voter mobilization.

 
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