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Leonard Thiessen social justice triptych deserves wider audience

January 21, 2017 Leave a comment

There is a compelling social justice triptych by the late great Nebraska artist Leonard Thiessen that should be more widely seen. Every year around Black History Month I encourage folks to visit the worship space that houses the piece for the express purpose of taking in the powerful images and ideas expressed in the work. The piece is called “Crucifixion” and it can be found affixed to a wall just inside the sanctuary at Church of the Resurrection, a small but mighty Episcopal faith community at 3004 Belvedere Boulevard directly across the street from Miller Park and just northwest of 30th and Kansas. The blended congregation is a mix of African-Americans, Caucasians and Africans.

The Thiessen work is not like anything you’d expect to find there or in any worhsip place for that matter. “Crucifixon” juxtaposes jarring, disturbing scenes of lynching, gas attacks, warmaking, want, industrialization and propoganda with the crucified Christ. Passages drawn from scripture proffer warnings about sins against our fellow man and being led astray by false prophets. These abnomitions are leavened by promises of recknoning and salvation. Thiessen created the triptych many decades ago but it is still relevant today in its rumination on things that instill fear and conflict in the hearts and minds of human beings and that cause us to look to a redemptive Higher Power for mercy and justice.

The words that appear at the bottom of the panels read:

“In time of peace, men suffer from drouth and want. Fear not, for I am with thee. I will bring they seed from the Earth.”

“They are made with machines, slaves of other machines. Be strong, fear not, your God will come with recompense.”

“Other men incite them to persecution and destruction. Keep ye judgment and do justice for my salvation is near.”

“From all sides their faith is confused and confounded. Behold, I create new heavens and a new Earth and the former shall not be remembered.”

The artist created “Crucifixion” in memory of his aunt, Wilhemina Berg, who was a member of the former St. John’s Church before it merged with St. Philip”s to create Church of the Resurrection,  The work is an example of Thiessen’s ability to employ and transform classical forms into modern interpretations. The piece is regarded as one of Thiessen’s most important.

In an interview shortly after his retirement, Thiessen said he had worked to “break down the idea that the arts were the prerogative of the elite. Nowadays the arts, like boating, skiing, tennis and wines, are all for the person in the street.”

Thiessen spoke four languages and was particularly known for his wit, often trying to slip puns past his editors at the Omaha World-Herald, for whom he was an art critic. Over the years, he taught at many area institutions, including Creighton, UNL and UNO.

He is classified as belonging to the period as the First Nebraskans, an era in Nebraska’s art history from 1901 to 1950 when the various forms of modernism were flourishing.

His vision and passion for the arts in Nebraska laid an influential foundation.

A good way to see the triptych and get a sense for the church where it’s displayed is to attend a service there. The 10 a.m. Sunday service is an intimate experience animated by the choir most Sundays and the guest band ReLeaseT the third Sunday of the month. On Feb. 26 come to Soul Food Sunday for some great eats. But whenever you come, make sure you see the triptych.

Link to the Church of the Resurrection website here:

http://coromaha.episcopal-ne.org/

 

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Link here to a Museum of Nebraska Art page devoted to Thiessen:

https://mona.unk.edu/collection/thiessen.shtml

Here is an extended bio of the artist copied from the MONA page:

Leonard Thiessen was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. His family was small and his paternal ancestry had roots to the Swedish and German pioneer settlers of Grand Island, Nebraska. For a very short time, the family lived in Grand Island where, as a boy, Thiessen was employed in the mail department of The Grand Island Independent newspaper. His parents, Charles Leonard Thiessen and Jean Louise Berg Thiessen, together with his mother’s favorite sister Wilhemina, were all involved in various creative endeavors and had a profound influence on Leonard’s development. His father worked in the printing industry and introduced the young Leonard to the trade. Jean was a talented self-taught artist in her own right who produced on-edge felt mosaics that are fine examples of early 20th century fiber art. (MONA has seven pieces of her work in its collection.) The Thiessens were involved in Omaha’s music, dance, and theater groups and deeply connected to the neighborhood Episcopal Church. They were not wealthy but had many friends in the community and had an impressive social calendar.

Thiessen attended Omaha’s Miller Park Public School and St. John’s Protestant School and graduated from Central High School in 1919. His school years were privileged with experiences that helped to foster his development as an artist. While in high school, he decided to follow formal study in the visual arts and began to draw cartoons and illustrations for the school newspaper. During his teen years, he worked as an office assistant for an architectural firm in downtown Omaha, a job that offered a perk that proved helpful to his future employment. During his free time, Leonard would sit and read the collection of architectural books found in the office. After graduation he worked for the Omaha Bureau of Advertising and Engineering editing illustrations and photographs for an agricultural livestock catalog.

He attended the University of Omaha (now University of Nebraska at Omaha) for three semesters in 1921 and 1922 studying journalism and fine arts and producing illustrations and graphic layouts for the University newspaper The Gateway. During this time, he worked as a gallery assistant for the Art Institute of Omaha which was located on the top floor of the old public library building designed by Thomas Kimball. Thiessen became disillusioned with the University’s conservative art courses and left Omaha to continue his studies in the School of Fine Arts at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln from 1925 to 1926. He was not interested in “serious painting” and majored primarily in design and architecture. His professors were the artists Dwight Kirsch, Louise Mundy, Francis Martin (a contemporary of the portraitist J. Laurie Wallace), and Emily Burchard Moore. In the 1920s, Lincoln, Nebraska was an incredibly fervent environment. Some of Thiessen’s circle of friends and classmates included artists as well as writers and intellectuals among them Katherine “Kady” Faulkner, Louise Austin (who had studied in Munich with Hans Hoffman), Mari Sandoz, Weldon Kees, Loren Eiseley, and Dorothy Thomas. In the late 1920s, Thiessen pursued a highly successful commercial career as an interior designer and decorator with several design and architectural firms in Lincoln and Omaha. Additionally, he did freelance work and began to receive commissions as a mural painter. Later he studied at the museums of New York City, Boston, and Miami with his Aunt Wilhemina.

In 1929, while on a trip to Paris, Thiessen learned of the stock market crash in the United States and decided to stay in Europe. He enrolled at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris where he studied drawing and painting for one summer and later moved to London to study at the Heatherly School of Art. While in London, Thiessen studied wood engraving and graphics. In 1932, he applied and was accepted at the Swedish Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm and studied with Otto Skold who later became the director of the National Museum at Stockholm. At the Academy, Thiessen studied the classical manner, graphic arts, and the traditional forms of fresco and mural painting. He described himself as a “designer of interiors and mural painter in the Middle West, U.S.” Taking several short breaks in between his studies to return to the United States, he finally received his diploma in 1938. While in Sweden, Thiessen made a trip to Tallin, Estonia, to sketch the local architecture.

After returning to the United States in the late 1930s, he found that demand for interior decorators had fallen with the depression. He used his charm and talent to persuade the editors of the Omaha World-Herald and the Lincoln Journal Star to allow him to write an arts review column. He became the Omaha World-Herald’s first art critic and his now legendary column first appeared in 1939 and continued on and off for the next 30 years.

He had exhibitions at Morrill Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, in 1938 and Omaha’s Joslyn Art Museum in 1940. He also resumed his friendships with artist Milton Wolsky and Alysen Flynn. Later he accepted a position in Des Moines as Iowa’s State Director of the Federal Artists and Writers Program of the Works Projects Administration in 1941. The program employed 300 people and Leonard supervised over 100 individuals in eight departments. Thiessen left Iowa in 1942 to join the Army and was officially promoted to the Office of Intelligence in 1944. Because of his training in architectural design and graphic arts, Thiessen was particularly suited for the position of draftsman in the intelligence department. He studied and made reports of pertinent visual data, maps, and serial photos during the war. He was stationed in Kettering, England, the place that would become the subject of many of his works on paper.

In the 1950s, Thiessen made another trip to London, returning to the United States to serve two years as director of the Herbert Memorial Institute of Art in Augusta, Georgia. In the 1960s, Thiessen took several other trips to Europe and returned to Nebraska where he immediately continued his involvement with the Omaha World-Herald, the Joslyn Art Museum and the Sheldon Museum of Art on the campus of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. By this time he was recognized as the authority on Nebraska’s developing art history and served as editor of the catalogue, Nebraska Art Today, by Mildred Goosman, curator at the Joslyn Art Museum published in 1967. He was instrumental in the establishment of the Nebraska Arts Council becoming its first Executive Secretary (a position now known as Executive Director) from 1966 to 1975. In addition, he taught classes at Isabella Threlkeld’s studio in Omaha for eight years. He became a close friend and professional colleague of the professors at Kearney State College (now University of Nebraska Kearney) and encouraged the establishment of the Nebraska Art Collection in the 1970s. He served on the board of the Museum of Nebraska Art for over ten years and was one of its founding members. In 1972 Thiessen received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts from Creighton University and was honored with the first Governor’s Arts Award in 1978. His work can be found at Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha; Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln; Kansas Wesleyan University, Salina; the Alfred East Gallery, Kettering, England; the Herbert Memorial Institute of Art, Augusta, Georgia; and in many private collections

Thiessen lived in Omaha, Nebraska, for most of his adult life. He eventually converted two upstairs rooms of the now famous house on Stone Avenue for his studio. Artwork dominated both floors, much of it his own. Thiessen remained a bachelor his entire life, and had an amazing number of friends and colleagues from the various Nebraska arts communities. He was respected by many prominent Nebraska artists who honored him by making him the subject of their work including Kent Bellows, Bill Farmer, Larry Ferguson, Frances Kraft, Paul Otero, John Pusey, and John Thein.

Leonard Thiessen died March 27, 1989.

The Museum of Nebraska Arts holds 109 works by Leonard Thiessen in addition to archival material.

Researched and written by Josephine Martins, 2002

NOTE: Biographical information was derived from a variety of sources, including unpublished biographical notes by William Wallis, 2001,  a recorded interview with Thiessen by Gary Zaruba, 1983 and compilations by COR member Keith Winton.

Harmonious, luminescent pairing of art – “Prayer” and “Share” – on exhibit at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery

September 12, 2016 Leave a comment

A harmonious, luminescent pairing of art called “Prayer” and “Share” on exhibition at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery through October 10.

The show closes the 2016 ArtLoft Gallery season with an inspired “Amen.”

Pamela Jo Berry explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs. Katie Cramer explores grace and fellowship through vessels. It is an art show that feeds the spirit and nurtures the soul. A display of beautiful aesthetics and inspiring intentions by two artists in touch with their spiritual dimensions. 

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists and their heartfelt art. It is a pairing made in Heaven.

The exhibition continues through October 10.  

Gallery hours are the same as the Mill: Wed. through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm; Sunday, 10 am to 3 pm. Sundays feature a Farmers Market.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

 

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Artist Statement by Pamela Jo Berry for “Prayer”:
“Prayer is that down to earth conversation we have with God when we realize we are not in control and we need … want to know that God… someone greater than us is out there… right here waiting to help us with our needs, our mistakes, our direction , our provision… and is ready to give a miracle if necessary. Prayer is that sacred moment when we sit in silence… after going over every scenario with God…. exhausted, we surrender and finally listen willingly for our answers…our direction… our next step in this life. Prayer is what we do for others when we know we cannot help with what they are crying out for. Prayer is the thank you and praise we give to God for the blessings and miracles we see in our lives and the lives of others…each day. It could be a smile, a hug, a healing…favor or something that comes out of the blue to save our lives. Prayer is a community standing for one person to be healed… and it is one person standing for healing in a community without hope. Prayer can be as loud as shouting for help and as quiet as a whisper of praise or as silent as a tear of realization that we are heard. Prayer is as simple as saying ‘God are you there?'”
Pamela’s Artist Bio:
Pamela Jo Berry …. She is an artist… mixed media/ photographic. She is a writer/poet. For the last six years she has organized the North Omaha Summer Arts. She is an Omaha Native. Pamela Jo is the mother of Jesse Berry and Beaufield Berry Fisher. And she is the Gemma (grandmother) of Shine Avett Fisher… her little grandson.

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Artist Statement by Katie Cramer for “Share”
Food is the most common and diverse ways to bring people together. Sharing it is meaningful culturally and historically throughout all regions of the world. I view pottery as vessels that share not only food, but the conversation and company that occurs. Many of these items are meant to be viewed as a set. The surface and aesthetic qualities from piece to piece is completely different, just like the people sharing the experience. The fact that they are placed in the same setting is what makes them come together.
 
Katie’s Artist Bio:
Katie Cramer was born and raised in Omaha. She took her first summer pottery class when she was 10 years old and completely fell in love with clay and the potter’s wheel. Her experience at Omaha North High School heightened this adoration for ceramics and pushed her to attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she is in the process of earning her Bachelor’s of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Ceramics. She is currently a 3rd year student with full intentions of pursuing ceramics as a profession.

 

 

“Prayer” and “Share” art exhibition at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery offers inspired “Amen”: Now through October 10

September 6, 2016 Leave a comment

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If you didn’t make it to the opening for the new exhibition at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery over Labor Day weekend, no worries – you have until October 10.

“Prayer” and “Share” at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery closes the 2016 ArtLoft Gallery season with an inspired “Amen.”

Pamela explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs. Katie explores grace and fellowship through vessels.

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists and their heartfelt art. It is a pairing made in Heaven.

The exhibition continues through October 10.  

Gallery hours are the same as the Mill: Wed. through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm; Sunday, 10 am to 3 pm. Sundays feature a Farmers Market.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

 

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Katie and Pamela

 

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The artists with Florence Mill ArtLoft director Linda Meigs

NOSA Arts Crawl to feature diverse art and artists – Friday, August 12


Come do the Crawl!

NOSA crawl Poster

NOSA Arts Crawl to feature diverse art and artists – Friday, August 12

The 2016 edition of North Omaha Summer Arts has seen the addition of new events and community partners and now NOSA’s gearing up for its 6th Annual Arts Crawl on Friday, August 12.

Founded in 2011 by North Omaha resident Pamela Jo Berry, NOSA is an entirely free, summer-long festival dedicated to the proposition that the arts can heal and build community. Berry, a mixed media artist, saw a need to infuse more art in all its forms into North Omaha and to give artists more opportunities to explore and showcase their work. The festival features some recurring events, such as the gospel concert in Miller Park in June, an Art and Gardening class at the Florence Branch Library in July and the Arts Crawl in August. A weekly women’s writing series just concluded and its students’ work will be published in an anthology.

New this year to the NOSA schedule are a variety of Pop-Up Art events, including the recent Thoreau Meets the Harlem Renaissance and Painting Bird Houses events. More Pop-Up Art happenings are planned. NOSA often works with community partners to present events, including recent collaborations with Compassion in Action, Girls Inc. and the Intergenerational Human Services Campus.

The highlight of NOSA each year is the Arts Crawl. This walkable, continuous art show presents the diverse work of emerging and established artists at venues on or near North 30th Street. This year’s Crawl runs from 6 to 9 p.m. on August 12. It starts at the Metropolitan Community College Fort Omaha campus Mule Barn building and ends at the North Heartland Family Service – with Church of the Resurrection, Nelson Mandela School and Trinity Lutheran in between.

The public is invited to walk or drive to each location to view art in various mediums, enjoy art demonstrations and speak with artists about their practice. Live music will be performed at some venues.

Many of the featured artists are from North Omaha.

For this year’s Crawl, each veteran artist is showing alongside a younger or less experienced artist with whom they share a close connection. For example. Gabrielle Gaines Liwaru is showing her art photography beside her daughter Cheamera Liwaru’s own photographs and Aaryon Lau Rance Williams is showing his paintings next to art created by youth from the after school arts program he operates.

“NOSA would like to welcome art lovers from around the metro to come out for this each-one-to-teach-one and it-takes-a-village celebration of community, family and art,” Berry said. “We are thrilled to be in our sixth year with North Omaha Summer Arts and we are thankful for all the partners, artists and volunteers who help make it happen and keep it a free event.”

A reception kicking off the Crawl will be held at the Charles B. Washington Branch Library, 2868 Ames Avenue, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.  Tara Evans and the Golden Thread Quilters, sponsored by Community Quilting Center Inc., will feature approximately 40+ quilts throughout the library. Both traditional and artistic quilts will be on display.

Free snacks and refreshments will be abatable at each stop along the Crawl route.

For more information, call 402-502-4669.

Visit the NOSA Facebook page at–
http://www.facebook.com/NorthOmahaSummerArts

Visit the Arts Crawl event page at–
https://www.facebook.com/events/1133908166708406/

Follow and like NOSA at–
https://www.facebook.com/NorthOmahaSummerArts/?fref=ts# or https://www.facebook.com/groups/1012756932152193/

 

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Scenes from NOSA’s Painting Bird Houses Pop-Up Art Event


Scenes from NOSA’s Painting Bird Houses Pop-Up Art Event

North Omaha Summer Arts has added Pop-Up Art Events this season, including a recent Thoreau Meets the Harlem Renaissance event at the Malcolm X Birthsite. The images posted here are from the Painting Bird Houses event held at the home of the artist Evance, who hosted and facilitated the class/happening on the wrap-around porch of her beautiful North Omaha home. Adults and children participated.

©Photos by Hans Hillie

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NOSA is collaborating with more community partners than ever before for arts events, including recent collaborations with Compassion in Action, Girls Inc. and the Intergenerational Human Services Campus. Look for posts about these happenings.

Meanwhile, the Women’s Writing Classes and Retreats have been going strong throughout the summer. Participants’ writing will be collected and published in an anthology.

And don’t miss the 6th Annual NOSA Arts Crawl happening in August–

Arts Crawl
Friday, August 12
Reception at Charles Washington Branch Library
5:30-6:30 pm.
The Crawl at several venues on or near North 30th Street
6 to 9 pm
This walkable, continuous art show showcases the diverse work of emerging and established artists at venues on or near North 30th Street. The 6th Annual Crawl starts at the Metropolitan Community College Fort Omaha campus Mule Barn building and ends at the North Heartland Family Service – with Church of the Resurrection, Nelson Mandela School and Trinity Lutheran in between. Walk or drive to view art in a wide variety of mediums, to watch visual art demonstrations and to speak with artists about their practice. Enjoy live music at some venues. Many of the featured artists are from North Omaha.

For this year’s Crawl, each veteran artist is showing alongside a younger or less experienced artist with whom they share a close connection. For example. Gabrielle Gaines Liwaru is showing her work beside her daughter’s and Aaryon Lau Rance Williams is showing his paintings next to art created by youth from the after school arts program he operates.

NOSA invites you come out for this each-one-to-teach-one and it-takes-a-village celebration of community, family and art.

Mural project celebrates mosaic of South Omaha culture


Historically, South Omaha is the city’s receiving community for new immigrants and refugees, though North Omaha plays some of that role, too. Blue collar jobs in the commerical, industrial labor sector have provided the livelihood for succeeding waves and generations of ethnic groups to have settled there. South O once had and to some extent still does have neighborhoods with distinct concentrations of ethnic groups. Traditionally, these ethnic enclaves become communities within the larger community. At one time, there were neighborhoods where Poles, Czechs, Lithuanians, Croats and other peoples of Eastern European origin established their own enclaves. There were also strong Italian, Irish and Mexican contingents. And the Great Migration brought many African Americans from the Deep South here as well. The railroads and packing houses were the main employers for many of these new arrivals. World War II-era manufacturing jobs were lures as well. The residents living in the various ethnic neighborhoods that took shape were bound by their shared birthplace, language, customs, religious affiliation and so on. They had their own churches and  community centers that reinfoced their tight-knit connections. Festivals celebrated their hertiage and traditions. Having long ago assimilated and with second-third generation descendants moving to other other sections of the city and with the wartime, railroad and packing house jobs disappearing, those once ethnic-centric areas in South Omaha became more homogenized over time. Today, only trace elements of their once ethnic identities remain. The last three decades have seen the emergence of new emigrees from Latin and Central America, Asia and Africa, thus repeating the patterns that happened with earlier groups in the late 19th century through the late 1920s. All of this is context for an art project now underway in South Omaha that celebrates the different heritages that have made it such a melting pot over time. The South Omaha Mural Project is creating a mural for each of the major ethnic groups that have populated the area. A future mural may also commemorate the stockyards-packing plant epoch that dominated the South Omaha landscape for decades with that industry’s acres of buildings and structures that emplpyed thousands of people and with all the ancilliary businesses that served those workers.

 

Mural project celebrates mosaic of South Omaha culture

©by Leo Adam Biga

Appearing in El Perico

 

What began as a one-off neighborhood mural by Richard Harrison and his daughter Rebecca Van Ornam has morphed into a project with several artists depicting historical South Omaha ethnic groups and landmarks.

When historian Gary Kastrick saw the South 13th Street mural Harrison and Van Ornam did illustrating the area’s Czech heritage, it sparked an idea for a mural culture series celebrating South Omaha’s role as a gateway for ethnic immigrant and refugee assimilation.

More murals followed through the help of the South Omaha Business Association (SOBA), who secured grants for a history mural at the Metropolitan Community College south campus and a Magic City Mural at 24th and N. Thus, the South Omaha Mural Project was born.

Artist Hugo Zamorano joined the team for a Lithuanian mural on the Lithuanian Bakery at 5217 South 33rd Avenue. A Mexican mural in the Plaza de la Raza was unveiled July 10. New murals are planned for the Polish, Irish, Croatian, Italian, Jewish, African-American ethnic enclaves that traditionally called South Omaha home. The more recently arrived Honduran, Guatemalan and El Salvadoran communities will get murals, too. There’s talk of one celebrating South O’s stockyards-meatpacking legacy as well.

The Polish mural will adorn a wall of Dinker’s Bar at 2368 South 29th Street. The Irish mural will grace another popular hangout, Donohue’s Pub, at 3232 L Street.

“We’re looking for walls that have good visibility in relationship to the neighborhood,” Harrison said. “Size is a good thing.”

Every wall poses its own challenges.

“When a wall is rough and covered with obstacles like water meters and things we are coming up with solutions of putting up

profile cut sign boards with characters and symbols on them, so the wall has sort of a pop-up book, three-dimensional feeling to it,” Harrison said.

Project funding comes from SOBA, the Nebraska Arts Council, the Mayor’s Neighborhood Grants Program, the City of Omaha’s Historical Grant initiative and various community sources.

David Catalan served as SOBA president when the organization decided to support the mural project. He said the project aligns well with SOBA’s mission of “preserving the diversity and heritage of South Omaha.”

Some ethnic organizations hold fundraisers to help underwrite their individual murals. The South Omaha Neighborhood Alliance is a new partner.

Harrison is a project facilitator and a supporting artist. Giron and Zamorano trade-off as lead artist. Kastrick serves as the history consultant. Catalan is an advisor and liaison.

 

 

This labor of love entails extensive community engagement and input for each mural. Multiple public meetings elicit information and ideas. The public can view the final sketch projected on a wall and can join community paint days.

“We are connecting with a lot of people in each successive community we focus on,” Harrison said. “We’re happy how fast this connects with people and how much it matters to them. They come to the meetings and share their stories and memories. Everybody we talk to finds it meaningful to them.”

He believes the community taking ownership of the murals explains why none have suffered graffiti.

After the communal paint days, Harrison, Giron, Zamorano and other artists paint for a month or two – working in acrylics to sharpen images and to apply shading and highlights. A clear protective sealer is added at the end.

When a mural’s finished, a public celebration is held.

This community-based approach is much more involved than the private commissions Harrison does under his A Midsummer’s Mural business but he said it’s all worth it.

“What’s really special is bringing the community together to talk about what’s important to them and what memories they have.”

Kastrick, a retired Omaha South High history teacher who leads South Omaha history tours, hopes the murals educate and entertain about South O’s long, unfolding melting pot story.

“It’s about rekindling South Omaha roots in people who moved away and reestablishing those roots with their children and grandchildren. I envision people coming to see the murals and talking about the people and the history they see on them.”

He and Harrison believe the murals can be destination attraction urban maps for residents and visitors wanting to learn about the area’s cultural history.

None of the primary artists working on the project are originally from Omaha and for these transplants each mural is an education.

“There is a lot that I did not know before this project and still more to learn.,” said Zamorano.

The Mexican mural he took the lead on is a perfect example.

“Almost everything I learned was new information to me. I learned about some of the different waves of Mexicans that moved to Omaha, why they moved, and where they came from.  I never knew how much the Catholic church and Lutheran church were involved in the community helping people move forward in education and empowerment. The list goes on. I never knew how much history there is in South Omaha alone.”

Fostering appreciation for place is what the project team wants every mural to encourage. Zamorano said Mexican mural images represent “topics and themes about unity, struggle, education, work, identity, education and celebration.” A working couple eats dinner with their family. A “Dreamer” graduates high school. Community anchors, such as the American GI Forum and Chicano Awareness Center, loom large. “In the center,” he said “an ancient Aztec god and two children share a history book to symbolize the past and future.”

Follow the project’s progress at http://www.amidsummersmural.com/for-communities/south-omaha-mural-project/.

North Omaha Summer Arts continues its art and nature themes with Thoreau Meets The Harlem Renaissance – Friday, July 15


 

Pam berry Ren Posterv3g

 

 

North Omaha Summer Arts continues its art and nature themes with:

Thoreau Meets The Harlem Renaissance

Come and join us…
Friday, July 15
9 am to 1 pm
Malcolm X Mermorial Foundation
3463 Evans Street

We are exploring the connection between American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist and historian Henry David Thoreau with The Harlem Renaissance.

Drawing instruction by artist Ronald Sykes.
Writing instruction facilitated by author Kim Louise.

We will take time to walk, draw and write in the beautiful woods located in the middle of North Omaha at the Malcolm X birthsite.

Lunch and discussion, plus spoken word performance by Felicia WithLove Webster. And we will document pictures of your creations for our virtual gallery on the North Omaha Summer Arts (NOSA) Facebook page.

No drawing or writing experience necessary.
Supplies provided
This class is free of charge.
Bring your chairs and blankets

For registration or questions, call 402-502-4669.

Follow and like NOSA’s free community-based arts festival at–
https://www.facebook.com/NorthOmahaSummerArts/

Mark you calendars for the 6th Annual Arts Crawl on Friday, August 12 from 6 to 9 pm at several North 30th Street venues.

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