Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Artists’

Abstract Mindz: Group gives artists a voice and showcase


Abstract Mindz: Group gives artists a voice and showcase

©by Leo Adam Biga

Appearing in El Perico (el-perico.com)

Image result for abstract minz omaha

 

Abstract Mindz founder Jose Antonio “Tony” Barrales, 25, wants to give young artists what he didn’t have growing up.

The Omaha Central High School graduate started the artist collaborative in 2013, he said, to give underrepresented youth “an opportunity to showcase their talent.”

“There were tons of people in the South Omaha community whose work wasn’t being seen and who weren’t being offered the opportunities others were. I had this idea to create an arts group that would hopefully become a gallery in the future. No one would be rejected based off their art style, age, ethnicity.

“There’s a ten year build-up of passion behind this group. Growing up in traditional Mexican homes trying to pursue art as a career wasn’t something our parents deemed worth pursuing or spending money on.”

In addition to lack of support at home, he and others found inequity at school, where, he said “certain students got opportunities others didn’t,” such as mentoring. “That’s when my passion to create the group was really sparked because I was one of those overlooked kids. I was like, Hey, I’m doing artwork, too – why am I not getting a shot to show what I’ve got. I saw other people who deserved their shot and didn’t get it, and they gave up.”

Barrales wants to affirm others.

“There’s real talent out there, but people feel like they can’;t make it on their own or there’s no one to help them out. i just want people to have a free wall space where they can express who they are and show people what they do.”

Artist Ari Marquez, 28, helps run the collaborative.

“Art was like my escape for expressing my emotions. A lot of our members are the same,” she said. T”hey don’t like to verbalize what they’re feeling or going through. Instead of saying it, they draw or paint or photograph it.

“Sharing their work can help with the healing process from hardships and darkness they have. It’s hopefully an escape to express themselves in ways that maybe the adults in their lives wouldn’t accept. Some of the kids are expressing a scream for help or attention. We create a safe space for them to express without being judged.”

It’s a catalyst for work to be made and seen.

“We’ve learned there’s a whole bunch of kids who have this secret talent no one knows about,” Barrales said.

“They have that passion to do things, but they might be scared to try or don’t know who to talk to about creating opportunities for themselves.”

 

Image result for abstract minz omaha

 

Barrales knows from experience “it’s really hard establishing yourself in the art community.” You’re bound to be asked, what have you done? and where have you shown?

“Most of our artists do abstract art, graffiti art – things that are more urban. We want them to know that can be marketable. We have artists who’ve gone to local galleries with their portfolios only to be turned away because the professionals said their art style is not what they show in their spaces.

“That’s something we want to change. This urban art is really popping in other cities and we want it to be seen that same way here.”

He’s working on the organization becoming an LLC.

“We’re looking at getting our own dedicated gallery. We want to be based in South Omaha. Most art galleries around here are collectives, We’re shooting for the same thing. We want this to grow to where we have mentoring programs and can support locations in Fremont and Lincoln, so people can have showcases in their own communities.”

Without a space of its own, Abstract Mindz has thus far relied on partnerships to show work in loaned spaces.

“Luckily we’ve found a welcoming space in the Bancroft Street Market. Our first show in 2015 was there. We had 15 artists. Each sold one piece. That motivated us to continue.”

More shows there followed. A Day of the Dead exhibit included performance by the local band.Mariachi Patria Juvenil. The largest and longest running show displayed 50 pieces for a month at Hotel LR.

Bellevue Social Center hosted another exhibit.

South Omaha entrepreneur Macros Mora donated a booth space for the group at the Cinco de Mayo market.

Local playwright Ellen Struve has worked with the group in different ways..

“She’s been sending us to the right people to talk to. She’s been great in helping with our outreach,” Barrales said. “She also presented us a great opportunity to participate in her new play EPIC for the Great Plains Theatre Conference. We were one of the groups she did story circles with. We told our own personal stories to help create the backstory for her play.

“The high school-age kids really loved it. She did an activity to open them up to speak. It’s something they usually don’t do. They felt really comfortable in that circle. They are amazed knowing their story is implemented in this play.”

Abstract Mindz members range from high school and college students to college grads working full-time jobs. Their ranks include Shantee Zamora, Sergio Gomez, Salem Munoz and Gerado “Polo” Diaz.

Abstract Mindz presented a solo show of Diaz’s work.

“He was a little more mature in his craft and body of work,” Barrales said, “so we gave him an individual showcase. He’s one of the main artists we have who wants to make this his career.”

Members pay minimal dues and get help with framing, portfolios and marketing.

The group’s planned next show, Visual Sounds, is in need of a venue. Participating artists were asked to create a large piece based on a song of their choice.

“This collaboration of music and visual arts will be our first interactive gallery. As spectators view each artwork they can put on headphones to listen to the correlating song.”

A place and date is in the works.

Follow Abstract Mindz on Facebook.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga’s work at leoadambiga.com.

Advertisements

Expressionistic images by Elisa Morera Benn

December 26, 2018 Leave a comment

 

No automatic alt text available.

Expressionistic images by Elisa Morera Benn

©by Leo Adam Biga

Originally published in El Perico (el-perico.com)

Costa Rica native Elisa Morera Benn of Omaha has been making art infused with the colors and passions of her tropical Central American homeland since childhood.

“All my life my surroundings have been full of contrasts. Shades of green, red, orange, a whole range of intensities and feelings. It is impossible to separate artists from their visual and emotional environment,” she said.

She’s one of four siblings born to a customs agent father and stay-at-home mother.

“My father worked hard to give his children a private education. He later managed to open his own business.”

Benn studied with masters. Each gave her something that grew her as an artist.

“With Francisco Alvarado Avella, I learned the eroticism that always covered his paintings. With Soraya Goicoechea the realism of the portrait. With Max Rojas, the use of expressionism. With Isabel Naranjo, realism. With Rodolfo Rocha, I learned how to mix all these techniques.”

Her work’s shown internationally at the Louvre Museum in Paris, France and at galleries and museums in Fabriano, Italy, Juarez, Mexico, Toronto, Canada and Houston, Texas.

Since moving to America with her husband, Dr. Douglas Benn, an adjunct professor at the Creighton University School of Dentistry, she’s consistently shown her work in Nebraska. She recent exhibited at the Artists Cooperative Gallery in the Old Market. She has work at the Burkholder Project in Lincoln. She’ll show some pieces at her studio during the Hot Shops open house in December.

She and her husband reside in a near downtown home accented by her own art and by artwork they’ve collected. The couple met five years ago in Costa Rica when he visited there. They married three years ago.

Benn was no stranger to America, where she traveled on school vacations and visited an aunt in Florida.

“Once I moved here, I fell in love with Omaha, which is full of art.”

As a girl in Costa Rica a school teacher and a newly arrived classmate from Cuba affirmed her talent.

“All my life I have painted and drawn,” said Benn, who found her voice in art.

“My formal studies were in architecture but I didn’t finish. But always the drawing was in my blood,”

Like any artist, she finds inspiration in many sources. The paintings of Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt and his use of gold leaf foil are particularly influential.

“Klimt’s symbolism seems extraordinary to me – the way he uses symbolism and geometric patterns, which I always use in my work.”

Expressionism best describes her style, though she incorporates elements of surrealism as well.

“We live in anxiety about humanity’s increasingly discordant relationship with the world and accompanying lost feelings of authenticity and spirituality. I am an expressionist and as such support the rebellion to be free from academic restrictions. I want to be free in the way I express myself.”

The style fits her temperament and vision.

“These techniques were meant to convey the emotional state of my feelings and my art reacting to the anxieties of the modern world with all the problems of this particular period of time. This style allows me to have that freedom of expression.

“True art always causes an emotion in the spectator. When I succeed in transmitting the feeling I want to reflect in my painting to the viewer then I feel I have achieved my goal.””

She often deals with women’s emotional states in her work.

“Capturing the emotions and feelings reflected in a face is a challenge. I achieve feeling THROUGH a painting. Reflecting the model’s expression of joy, sadness, excitement, sensuality, for me is a challenge that I like.”

When dealing with women subjects she uses eroticism to capture mood and atmosphere.

“Why not? These feelings are part of human beings.”

After all, she said, seduction and mysticism are well known ways to captivate viewers.

“There are many ways to convey eroticism,” she said. “All of Georgia O’Keefe’s work is wrapped in eroticism and sensuality in a very subliminal way. Then there are the very criticized erotic drawings of (Gustave) Courbet’s realism, which is not my message, nor my style. I prefer the model of the painting have the expression and leave the rest to the imagination.

No automatic alt text available.

Benn’s imagination sometimes supplies the human figures in her work. Other times she works from live models.

“The imaginary models are easier to work with. When one makes a painting of a live model, more is known by friends and family, so the level of accuracy has to be higher, which is more difficult. Normally everyone has a mental image of how we see ourselves, so to satisfy the model and also make the painting in your style, it’s quite a challenge.”

She makes her paintings directly on wood and enjoys the texture the surface gives her work.

“I really like how the lines of wood are mixed inside the face of my paintings. When I paint on canvas, the backgrounds go with the personality of the models. For example, I painted a friend who is a metal sculptor, so her surroundings have to be where she was born here in the USA and what she does.”

Visit http://www.artistamorera.com.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga’s work at leoadambiga.com.

Life Itself XIV: Art stories through the years

August 4, 2018 Leave a comment

Life Itself XIV: Art stories through the years

Brigitte McQueen Shew

 

 

Free North Omaha Summer Arts Crawl features variety of art forms – Friday, August 10 at select North 30th Street Corridor venues

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/07/25/free-north-omaha…-corridor-venues

Process equals passion for migrant Bemis resident artist Trevor Amery

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/03/08/process-equals-p…ist-trevor-amery

Sculptor Benjamin Victor gives shape to Ponca Chief Standing Bear’s enduring voice

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/05/01/sculptor-benjami…s-enduring-voice

Mural Man – Artist Mike Giron captures heart of South Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/05/02/mural-man-artist…t-of-south-omaha

A Fluid Life: Dana Oltman Goes With the Flow

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/08/03/a-fluid-life-dan…es-with-the-flow

New Artist Residency Program at El Museo Latino supports the practice of local Latino artists

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/06/10/new-artist-resid…l-latino-artists/

Art in the heart of South Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/09/22/art-in-the-heart-of-south-omaha

 

triptych2

©“Crucifixion”  triptych by Leonard Thiessen

 

 

 

Brigitte McQueen Shew’s Union of art and community uses new Blue Lion digs to expand community engagement

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/06/26/brigitte-mcqueen…unity-engagement/

South Omaha Museum: A melting pot magic city gets its own museum

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/04/13/a-melting-pot-ma…s-its-own-museum

Artist Erin Blayney: The Great Reveal

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/08/03/artist-erin-blay…the-great-reveal/

Omaha Fashion Week & SAC Federal Credit Union: Building the fashion eco-system via business focus

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/08/05/omaha-fashion-we…a-business-focus

Leonard Thiessen social justice triptych deserves wider audience

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/01/21/leonard-thiessen…s-wider-audience

 

img_4249

img_4246  img_4247

fullsizerender-1

img_4248 ©Crosses and prayer stations by Pamela Jo Berry and pottery by Katie Cramer

 

 

Harmonious, luminescent pairing of art – “Prayer” and “Share” – on exhibit at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/09/12/harmonious-lumin…-artloft-gallery

Mural project celebrates mosaic of South Omaha culture

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/07/19/mural-project-ce…th-omaha-culture/

 

 

Los Dias de Los Muertos festival offers three weeks of exhibits and events

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/10/16/los-dias-de-los-…ibits-and-events

My Joslyn Art Museum Community Pick is Thomas Hart Benton’s “The Hailstorm”

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/08/03/my-joslyn-commun…s-picked-and-why

Bright Lights: Teen designer Ciara Fortun mines Filipino heritage in Omaha Fashion Week collection

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/07/29/bright-lights-te…-week-collection

 

Yolanda Diaz success story with Little Miss Fashion nets her new recognition

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/05/05/yolanda-diaz-suc…-new-recognition

Yolanda Diaz works on a skirt in her Little Miss Fashion shop in Omaha. (©Photo by Mike Tobias, NET News)

 

 

The Designers: Omaha’s Emerging Fashion Culture

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/02/02/the-designers-om…-fashion-culture

A Passion for Fashion: Omaha Fashion Week emerges as major cultural happening

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/09/21/a-passion-for-fashion

Coming Home: Watie White’s public art installation tells stories of North Omaha home and family

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/02/07/coming-home-wati…-home-and-family

Art and community meet-up in artist’s public projects; Watie White mines urban tales

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/09/24/art-and-communit…ines-urban-tales

 

Home exterior art installation by Watie White

 

 

The Artist in the Mill: Linda Meigs brings agriculture, history and art together at Florence Mill

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/08/01/linda-meigs-brin…at-florence-mill/

Opera Omaha enlists Jun Kaneko for new take on “The Magic Flute” –  co-production of Mozart masterpiece features stunning designs setting the opera world abuzz

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/02/01/opera-omaha-enli…pera-world-abuzz

Isabella Threlkeld’s lifetime pursuit of art and Ideas yields an uncommon life

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/04/isabella-threlke…an-uncommon-life

 

Isabella (Byrne) Threlkeld

Isabella Threlkeld

 

 

Omaha arts-culture scene all grown up and looking fabulous

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/03/06/omaha-arts-culture-scene-grows-up

Artists running with opportunity to go to the next level; Carver Bank resident artists bring new life to area

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/05/20/artists-running-…new-life-to-area

Carver Building rebirthed as arts-culture haven; Theaster Gates, Rebuild and Bemis reimagine North Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/12/05/carver-building-…gine-north-omaha

North Omaha synergy harkens new arts-culture district for the city

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/26/a-synergy-in-nor…ict-for-the-city

 

Inaugural group of Carver Bank resident artists

 

 

Change is gonna come: GBT Academy in Omaha undergoes revival in wake of fire

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/14/a-change-is-gonn…the-wake-of-fire

Community-builders Jose and Linda Garcia devote themselves to a life promoting Latino art, culture, history

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/09/30/community-builde…-culture-history

The Wonderful World of Artist and Social Entrepreneur Jeffrey Owen Hanson

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/01/01/the-wonderful-wo…frey-owen-hanson

Matter of the heart: Pamela Jo Berry’s love for community brings art fest to North Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/08/08/pamela-jo-berry-…-in-diverse-work

Old Market Pioneer Roger duRand

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/12/26/old-market-pioneer-roger-durand

 

©Work by Wanda Ewing

 

 

Wanda Ewing Exhibit: Bougie is as Bougie Does 

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/12/08/wanda-ewing-exhi…s-as-bougie-does

Color Me Black, Artist Francoise Duresse Explores Racial Implications 

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/17/color-me-black-a…ications-of-race

Artist-Author-Educator Faith Ringgold, A Faithful Conjurer of Stories, Dreams, Memories and History

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/04/18/artist-author-ed…ries-and-history

Old Market-based artist Sora Kimberlain: A life in art

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/20/old-market-based…in-a-life-in-art

Artist Claudia Alvarez’s new exhibition considers immigration

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/23/artist-claudia-a…ders-immigration

For artist Terry Rosenberg, the moving human body offers canvas like no other

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/23/for-artist-terry…as-like-no-other

 

 

©Works by Terry Rosenberg

 

 

Fine art photographer Vera Mercer’s coming out party

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/02/18/artist-vera-merc…coming-out-party

Exhibit by photographer Jim Krantz and his artist grandfather, the late David Bialac engages in an art conversation through the generations

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/28/photographer-jim…-the-generations/

 

A very young Jim Krantz with iconic mentor, Ansel Adams, ©photo Jim Krantz

 

Touched by Tokyo: Hairstylist to the Stars Tokyo Stylez

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/08/27/touched-by-tokyo…ars-tokyo-stylez/

The Troy Davis Story: From Beyond the Fringe to Fringes Salon

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/12/27/the-troy-davis-s…to-fringes-salon/

Hair stylist-makeup artist Omar Rodriguez views himself as artisan

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/05/13/hair-stylist-mak…mself-as-artisan/

Young artist steps out of the shadows of towering presence in his life

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/03/a-young-artist-s…ence-in-his-life/

Eddith Buis, A Life Immersed in Art

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/11/eddith-buis-a-life-immersed-in-art/

Artist Bernard Stanley Hoyes explores the lamentations and celebrations of Jamaican revival worship

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/28/artist-bernard-s…-revival-worship

 

Flow with the Rhythm, ©Bernard Stanley Hoyes (the Lamentations and Celebrations of Jamaican Revival Worship) -“The intention is to show where we gather our strength in all the trials and tribulations we have to endure. The strength comes from the commonality of our spiritual seeking. That’s one of the reasons I group the figures together and put them kind of like solid. They feel like one. You need all these bodies together to evoke the strength of what it takes to have a spiritual community.":

©”Flow with the Rhythm” by Bernard Stanley Hoyes

 

 

Catherine Ferguson’s exploration takes her to Verdi’s “Aida” and beyond

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/01/artist-catherine…-aida-and-beyond

Therman Statom works with children to create glass houses and more

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/31/glass-artist-the…kids-art-brigade

Blizzard Voices: Stories from the Great White Shroud

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/07/27/blizzard-voices-…eat-white-shroud

African presence in Spanish America explored in three presentations

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/25/african-presence…ee-presentations

Jose and Linda Garcia find new outlet for their magnificent obsession in the Mexican American Historical Society of the Midlands

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/25/jose-and-linda-g…-of-the-midlands

Timeless Fashion Illustrator Mary Mitchell: Her Work Illustrating Three Decades of Style Now Subject of New Book and Exhibition

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/01/07/timeless-fashion…k-and-exhibition/

 

Mary Mitchell in her studio, @photo Jim Scholz

 

 

A Passion for Conservation: Tara Kennedy

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/11/25/a-passion-for-co…ion-tara-kennedy

Nancy Kirk: Arts maven, author, communicator, entrepreneur, interfaith champion

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/21/nancy-kirk-arts-…erfaith-champion

Art as revolution: Brigitte McQueen’s Union for Contemporary Art reimagines what’s possible in North Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/25/art-as-revolutio…e-in-north-omaha

“Portals” opens new dimensions in performance art – Multimedia concert comes home for Midwest premiere

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/06/portals-opens-ne…midwest-premiere

Open Minds: “Portals” explores human longing in the digital age

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/04/15/open-minds-porta…-the-digital-age

 

©Triptych designed and painted by Bro. William Woeger

 

 

Soon Come: Neville Murray’s passion for Loves Jazz & Arts Center and its role in rebirthing North Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/28/soon-come-nevill…hing-north-omaha

Inner City Art Exhibition Tells Wide Range of Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/01/an-inner-city-ex…range-of-stories

Art from the Streets

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/01/art-from-the-streets

Manifest Beauty: Christian Bro. William Woeger devotes his life to Church as artist and creative-cultural-liturgical expert

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/27/manifest-beauty-…-cultural-center

Photographer Larry Ferguson’s work is meditation on the nature of views and viewing

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/21/photographer-lar…iews-and-viewing/

Frederick Brown’s journey through art: Passage across form and passing on legacy

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/22/frederick-browns…ing-on-of-legacy

 

 

 

 

Jazz and blues artist Frederick J. Brown displays his painting “Stagger Lee,” in Kansas City, Mo.

 

 

A stitch in time builds world-class quilt collection and center-museum

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/21/a-stitch-in-time…nd-center-museum

Once More With Feeling: Loves Jazz & Arts Center back from hiatus 

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/05/once-more-with-f…back-from-hiatus

Adventurer-collector Kam-Ching Leung’s Indonesian art reveals spirits of the islands

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/14/adventurercollec…s-of-the-islands

 

 

©Indonesian art piece, collection of Kam-Chieng Leung

 

 

Kent Bellows Legacy Lives On

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/13/bellows-legacy-lives-on/

Kent Bellows: Soul in Motion

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/09/21/kent-bellows-soul-in-motion

Rebecca Herskovitz forges an art family at Kent Bellows Studio and Center for Visual Arts

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/13/rebecca-herskovi…-for-visual-arts/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Self-portraits by Kent Bellows

 

 

Art for Art’s Sake: Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/09/21/art-for-arts-sak…ontemporary-arts

Combat sniper-turned-art photographer Jim Hendrickson on his vagabond life and enigmatic work

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/30/combat-sniper-tu…d-enigmatic-work

Naturalist-artist John Lokke – In pursuit of the Timber Rattlesnake and In the footsteps of Karl Bodmer

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/09/02/naturalist-artis…s-of-karl-bodmer

 

©Painting by John Lokke

 

 

Art Missionaries, Bob and Roberta Rogers and their Gallery 72

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/19/art-missionaries

Photographer Monte Kruse pushes boundaries

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/22/photographer-mon…ushes-boundaries

From the Archives: Photographer Monte Kruse works close to the edge

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/13/from-the-archive…lose-to-the-edge

North Omaha Summer Arts (NOSA) presents: An Arts Crawl 7


North Omaha Summer Arts (NOSA) presents:

An Arts Crawl 7

Friday, August 10

6 to 9 p.m.

Join us for the 7th Arts Crawl

Take a stroll or drive from Metropolitan Community College Fort Omaha campus down North 30th Street, ending at Trinity Lutheran Church, to experience beautiful art and great food by North O visual, performing and culinary artists.

A free event.

 

 

An Arts Crawl reception kicks things off at the

Washington Branch Library, 2888 Ames Avenue, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.

All other locations open 6 to 9 p.m.

Arts Crawl route Begins at–

MCC at Fort Omaha

Mule Barn (Building #21)

Church of the Resurrection

3004 Belvedere Blvd. (just northwest of 30th and Kansas)

Nelson Mandela School

6316 North 30th Street

Ends at–

Trinity Lutheran Church

6340 North 30th Street

For more info (artists and patrons), call Pamela Jo Berry at 402-445-4666

 

Process equals passion for migrant Bemis resident artist Trevor Amery

March 8, 2018 1 comment

Process equals passion for migrant Bemis resident artist Trevor Amery

©story by Leo Adam Biga

©photos by Bill Sitzmann

Appears in the March-April 2018 issue of Omaha Magazine ( http://omahamagazine.com/ )

Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts resident Trevor Amery is a well-traveled maker. The sculptor, whose Bemis stay began January 11 and runs through mid-March, has done residencies in Mexico, Hungary and Finland. He’s completed projects in Alaska, Florida and many points in between.

After years on the East Coast, he now makes California home, though he’s often just returning from or embarking on a new art-life adventure. This summer he expects to go to China.

Some journeys have proved transformative. In the course of the 2011 Finland sojourn, fate or circumstance intervened to change his practice from painting to sculpture. He had just left his former risk-adverse life as an admissions counselor at Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore to heed the very advice he gave students – to live freely and fearlessly. He’d no sooner broken away from his own safe, prescribed higher ed rut to go to far-off Finland, when, en route, all his oil paints were confiscated by airport security.

There he was, adrift in a strange country, unequipped to create in the manner he’d come all that way to do.

“I didn’t have a lot of money to go and buy all new oil paints in one of the most expensive countries in the European Union,” Amery says. “I just had to figure out how to start making.”

Enraptured by the dense forests of the residency’s idyllic rural setting and the ubiquitous, large firewood piles he saw outside every home, he surrendered the idea of painting to create instead in wood. It helped that he had an extensive woodworking background.

“I started splitting wood to understand it as a material. I’d wake up and split as much wood as I could handle and I learned so much more about it than I ever did working in a wood shop. I started doing these stacked firewood piles. I made a 12-foot tall spinning wood pile on a children’s merry-go-round as a kinetic permanent sculpture. I did a 6-foot-by-6 foot-by 6-foot cube of firewood on a floating dock in the middle of the lake outside the old schoolhouse I stayed in. I went into town to do woodpiles in urban niches – between buildings and mailboxes – and left them to be reclaimed.”

His “big epiphany” happened paddling wood out to the floating dock in the lake.

“I had this eureka moment of, ‘Wow, this could be my work. I don’t have to sit in a studio illustrating an idea with oil paint – I can actually be out in the world engaging nature and people, having the social aspects I crave.'”

For Amery, the journey in the making is everything.

“I just like process – problem-solving, engineering new solutions and stuff like that. I do have an interest in DYI culture, which also informs my practice. I grew up with two older brothers who were always taking apart and rebuilding cars, so I inherited a little bit of that interest. My mom’s an antique dealer. She deals in country rustic. She rewires lamps and reupholsters chairs. That kind of problem solving has always been in the family.”

Since Finland, Amery’s gone on to cast pieces of firewood in porcelain stoneware. This past summer in Wyoming he taught himself how to make his own charcoal using wood. While assisting with the set-up of a towering geodesic installation there, he salvaged a broken sledgehammer handle made of ash and converted it into a 30-inch, hand-hewn spoon sculpture in whose bottom he carved a tiny geodesic dome.

“Function plays a role in the work,” he says. “But this object also now has a really important history to it. I love the kind of shift in value that comes with provenance of objects and materials that I use. Because of a personal story with it, it has this new significance.”

He’s always searching for materials at Habitat for Humanity Restores, thrift shops, junkyards and wherever his eyes and curiosity lead him. Chance encounters turn into conversations that find him walking away with lessons and scraps for his sculptures.

 

In 2012 he came back from a residency in Hungary only to find himself “back to square one” in his work. Absent a project, he thought long and hard about finally realizing something he always wanted to make: a boat. Made of wood, of course.

“After some research, I set out to build my own Aleutian- style kayak, and I did. I made all the ribs out of green bent branches I cut in the woods in Maine.”

The design for the 17-foot vessel came from a downloaded PDF.

“The first year after I built it, I kind of denied its function. I was more interested in its making, its coming into being, the history of it. I built part of the frame in Maine and then drove it to Michigan, where it spent a year with me as this omnipresent dope object I couldn’t finish because I didn’t have the space to do it. It hung above me in the apartment making me feel bad for not working on it. I eventually brought it back to the east coast and then came to Calif. with it, where I finished it. But I was still using it as this studio-exhibition object and skirting its function. Then I decided I have to put it in the water.”

He secured a grant for a performative project whereby he drove the kayak all the way to Alaska to make its inaugural launch off the Homer Spit. He documented the experience with his Mamiya C330 camera.

On-site, he split a log to make his own paddle from tree branches. When the moment arrived to place the kayak in its heritage waters, he was overjoyed this object that traveled so far with him “actually worked great.”

The kayak trekked with him again when he took part in the Performance is Alive satellite art show in Miami.

“I kayaked through the different waterways of Miami to document the coastline and the relationship of these important spaces to water recreation and the city’s economy and looking at how this essentially sea level city will eventually be underwater.”

He successfully negotiated the voyage, only to have curator Quinn Dukes ask him go out again and finish in South Beach. Tempting fate, Amery recalls, “I went across the channel out into the ocean like a fool. Everything was gong fine actually and then the ocean floor dropped off at this one place that turned the ocean into a washing machine. This wave came from behind and capsized me many football fields away from the coastline. I thought I was done for. I was just this little head bobbing in the water. I tried flagging down a passing yacht but it cruised by. Finally, a jet skier who just happened to be out in the ocean jumping off waves, saw my waving arms and rescued me by throwing me a towline.”

Amery’s kayak and camera both survived the mishap.

“Out of all that came a whole new body of work of wooden wave sculptures I call ‘Capsized.'”

The artist is approaching Omaha the way he does all his residency stops – “keeping that opportunity for discovery.” “A huge part of it is what comes out of the relationships in a place,” he says. “Yes, the landscapes inspire me but also the people and the conversations.”

By the end of his Bemis stay, he expects to have worked on his sleeping bag forms and ‘Capsized’ wave series and to have responded to what he found here.

“Re-contextualizing or reorienting is one of the most important things for me,” he says.

But “allowing who you are to come out in the work as honestly you can” is where it’s at,” he adds. “The most authentic self you can have in the work is the real goal.”

Visit trevor-amery.com.

Brigitte McQueen Shew’s Union of art and community uses new Blue Lion digs to expand community engagement

June 26, 2017 1 comment

Brigitte McQueen Shew’s Union of art and community uses new Blue Lion digs to expand community engagement

©by Leo Adam Biga

Brigitte McQueen Shew so believes the arts can promote social justice she founded and directs The Union for Contemporary Art as a resource supporting artists in their practice and as a change agent engaging underserved North Omaha. Last year, The Union moved from cramped 2417 Burdette Street quarters in northeast Omaha to much larger new quarters at the nearby renovated Blue Lion Center.

Once that occurred, the organization’s already full program slate increased, as didl the number of people it serves.

Union artist studio and coop spaces, exhibits, youth activities, mural projects, community garden, tool lending library and neighborhood potlucks expanded with the fall move to the Blue Lion and courtyard at 24th and Lake. With the move, The Union is now an anchor at the intersection of a once thriving black business corridor and live music scene finally emerging as a new arts and culture district.

Going from 3,000 to 16,000 square feet has enlarged adult and youth spaces and thus allowed greater capacity and participation. There are dedicated facilities for graphic art, printmaking, ceramics, fiber arts, woodworking, cooking. Instead of leasing a storefront for its Wanda Ewing Gallery, the organization has a permanent gallery for curated shows in its new home. A mixed use space doubles as a black box theater hosting performances by Union’s newly formed Performing Arts Collective. Under the direction of Denise Chapman, the Collective stages African-American theater, dance, spoken word and music events.

The two-story, brick. century-old Blue Lion housed many enterprises, including McGill’s Blue Room, before going empty in recent years. Its new life is made possible by the Sherwood Foundation, whose purchase and renovation was expressly for the Union. McQueen Shew coveted the building as her organizatIon’s home. “It perfectly fit us,” she says.

Seizing the moment

“The Union has been a key player in the revitalization of the Blue Lion,” says former board member Julia Parker, Omaha Small Business Network (OSBN) executive director. “This is a culturally significant building known as a gathering place in North Omaha and the home of small business and job creation. The reopening of the Blue Lion is yet another indicator North 24th Street is being reactivated as an arts, culture and small business district.”

That district already includes Loves Jazz & Arts Center and Carver Bank. It also encompasses the Omaha Star, the Omaha Economic Development Corporation, OSBN and the former homes of the Great Plains Black History Museum and the Dreamland Ballroom. The recently opened Fair Deal Village Marketplace features cargo container spaces for micro entrepreneurs and artists.

All of this is in addition to major construction projects on North 30th Street, including Highlander Village, three new Metropolitan Community College Fort Omaha campus buildings and a new mixed-use of the former Mr. C’s site. Together with new housing developments, the Nelson Mandela school, the North Star Foundation campus, No More Empty Pots, the 40th Street Theatre, North O’s long dreamed of revitalization is taking shape.

“It’s our moment,” McQueen Shew says. “More money is coming into the community than has happened in years. I think it’s an amazing thing that’s happening and if you look at 24th and Lake, it’s the hub that connects everything together. This is our moment and if we don’t seize it then it just quiets down again. This is the time. That’s why it’s so important to me and why I push so hard.”

Seventy Five North Revitalization Corp. executive director Othello Meadows, whose organization is developing Highlander, says, “There’s this culmination of a lot of things happening at once and I think there’s definitely pressure to continue to move the ball forward. We’re not going to be satisfied with the status quo. We’re looking at new and innovative ways to address old problems. The point really is to continue to push and learn and get better at serving the community. A lot of people are saying, ‘Let’s try something different’ or let’s do something in existence before but do it better.”

Even with all these currents, McQueen Shew says, “so much more needs to happen in making it a place people want to live, such as dealing with food policy issues. North Omaha is one of Nebraska’s largest food deserts. How do you expect families to move into this community and set down roots if you can’t even get food? There’s lots of vacant land that needs developing. There’s lots of things we’re lacking on an infrastructure level. We need to coalesce behind real economic development. We also need to train the next generation of leaders. Who will they be? Those conversations need to be tackled now because there are eyes on North Omaha in a positive way that weren’t on this community before, and that’s exciting.”

She insists the arts will drive people to North 24th but once there they need other gathering places to hang out, such as eateries and coffeehouses. Meadows agrees arts-entertainment amenities are essential. “In a healthy community you have multiple avenues of self-expression and self-actualization for people to explore their interests and to fulfill who they are,” he says.

Stakeholders see retail commerce flowing in North Downtown, Midtown, Benson and South Omaha but still lagging on North 24th.

“I’ve started pointedly asking investors, developers and realtors why they don’t think this of this neighborhood or community for development” McQueen Shew says.

 

 

Art as social change

That she and The Union are players in this equation is unexpected given the organization launched only six years ago and its leader got fed up with Omaha the first time she lived here A journalist by training and trade, McQueen Shew worked for a national magazine when she arrived in 2001 at the urging of an artist friend residing here. She liked the local arts scene and the people but she hated the segregation that excluded persons of color from opportunities that, by contrast, were open to everyone in New York City, where she’d lived, and in Detroit, where she grew up.

She left Omaha dismayed by its racial inequity, but returned to do something about it. She asked people hard questions.

“When I got here it was like, ‘Well, this is just the way it is, this is the way it’s always been.’ And so I started asking why. Why have you never crossed Cuming Street? Why don’t you ever go over there? Why did this happen? How has this been allowed to go on?”

It took her awhile to find the right advocacy-activist vehicle. Her failed Pulp store in Benson nearly cost her everything. Then she ran the Underground Gallery at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts before a new idea overtook her: starting a North Omaha-based organization to address chronic studio space shortages and limited access to equipment and to engage residents through programs. The Union name reflects her interest in community, inclusivity, unity and sharing.

Among Omaha residencies The Union uniquely requires fellows do a community service project in North Omaha. McQueen Shew feels it’s vital artists give back, connect with community and demystify the arts. She believes deeply in fellows being social practice artists who do public work with some greater purpose. The Union’s Neighborhood Tool Library began as a project by then-fellow Kjell Peterson. During their residency Dan Susman and Andrew Monbouquette worked on their sustainable foods documentary Growing Cities and formed Truck Farm, a mobile urban farm ed program operating independently today.

“Having artists engaged and visible in the community gives North Omaha residents a chance to meet artists and talk art and to find out it’s not all about sacred spaces but really a part of everybody’s life,” says McQueen Shew.

She’s aware most fellows get their first real taste of North Omaha during their residency and she’s confident they leave with changed perceptions and broader knowledge.

Before doing her Union fellowship artist Shea Wilkinson says she was “completely ignorant of what was in North Omaha” but the experience so inspired her that she’d North Omaha her home. “I love my home and my neighborhood there. One hears a lot about the crime but rarely does one hear the things that make it an area worth investing in. I have lived here three years now and love seeing the positive changes happening.”

Artist Angela Drakeford grew up in North O but she says her Union residency helped her “think about the realities of what it meant to be a black artist in America,” adding, “I started not only to think about who I was and who my audience was but also what my obligations were as an artist. The Union has a very radical mission to help empower the community. Honestly, I would not be the artist and person I am today without this fellowship. It was truly a transformational experience.”

 

 

Embracing, implementing, fine-tuning a vision

The first person McQueen Shew shared The Union’s radical concept with, Katie Weitz, caught her vision and got the Weitz Family Foundation to back it. Not everyone was supportive. “I had donors tell me I was committing career suicide when I started The Union – that no one would follow me over here and no one would come.” She ignored the naysayers. “Maybe it’s just about tenacity.” Grants came in. She took a year to flesh out the idea and to devise a strategy for making The Union, launched in 2011, sustainable. At the start it was just herself at the repurposed former food bank on Burdette. As more funding’s come, she’s added staff and programs.

For a small nonprofit with a short history the organization’s made a large impact and won over many fans. So much so it isuccessfuly realizing a $5 million Growth Campaign to support its operations and programs.

Board chair Mary Zicafoose, a textiles artist, admires how McQueen Shew has “carved out a template for an organization designed to uniquely serve the community and become a unifying bridge for the arts for the entire metropolitan area. Many hundreds of metro area citizens and arts supporters have broken bread and attended Union community events that previously had never ventured farther north than Cuming Street. That’s powerful in itself. It’s mission is to unify our greater community through the arts and that is what it does program by program, artist by artist, exhibition by exhibition.”

Zicafoose has an insider perspective on how McQueen Shew has gained so much traction so fast for the organization and its niche.

“The Union’s mission and Brigitte’s vision is a story about understanding one’s purpose, seizing opportunity, taking action and then moving forward without hesitation. Her vision and attitude is simply quite contagious. Hence, the great interest, growth, stellar track record and support of this project. Brigitte is also an articulate and accomplished networker.”

No More Empty Pots executive director Nancy Williams says, “Brigitte is genuine. She has a rich history and eloquently shares her experiences. Brigitte is also generous. Brigitte has many talents and knows how to effectively leverage those talents for The Union. She is focused and reaches out for help when needed.” When McQueen Shew put out a call for folks to clean up the current site shortly after moving in, Zicafoose says “It was transformed in one weekend with the sweat equity of a hundred community volunteers.”

Zicafoose marvels at all the organization does. “It’s really quite shocking the amount of programming that has emerged from this small building, lovingly worked and reworked, to make every inch of precious space be of purpose. The move provides more appropriate and much needed additional space for existing programs to expand and thrive as well as allow new programs to be born. Its strategic location makes it a natural hub and meeting place.”

Seventy Five North’s Meadows appreciates that The Union is “a constant and consistent presence” instead of a “one-off” project. He adds, “What I love about Brigitte and what she’s doing is that she’s made a commitment to this neighborhood and to being there all the time. Having access to explore art is an amazing opportunity for this community, whose population is often forgotten about.” For a community that’s had many promises made and unfulfilled it was important McQueen Shew and the Union develop trust and Meadows says that’s happened. “People know she’s there for the right reasons.”

Prospect Village Neighborhood Association’s Rondae Hill is impressed by how The Union’s partnered on art-infused beautification projects, including a mural, bus benches and a redesigned park, in her area.
“Prospect Village appreciates everything the Union has helped to start in our neighborhood. The mural brought new life to an old building that started a ripple effect of prosperity. It has now become the center of our neighborhood and brings pride to the area.”

Not everything The Union’s done has succeeded but it’s small and nimble enough to try new things. Three areas where McQueen Shew feels it’s fallen short is connecting with area residents, helping artist fellows with their community service projects and integrating exhibition themes across all programming. To strengthen those elements she’s hired Nicole Caruth as director of pedagogy and public practice.

“Nicole joined our staff to help ensure all of our programs revolve around our commitment to social practice,” McQueen Shew says.

“Even though we were in the community people still saw us as Other. We were still missing the opportunity to connect. We had to fix that. Here at The Union we do everything as a team, so we had conversations about that disconnect. Nicole comes from that background. She has the resources and the networking connections
to be in tune with community.

“It’s about being flexible, realizing the gap and then going back and fixing it,. You have to be willing to jump off and readjust the course. It’s probably easier for The Union to do that than it is for an organization thats been around 40 years. Almost everything we do is a grand experiment. If we do it once and it works, awesome, let’s keep it. If it fails, then we’ glean some knowledge and let it go. We’re in an amazing position to do that.”

 

 

Forging a more perfect Union

The Union name is apt because in classic union organizing style, McQueen Shew came to Omaha as an outside agitator to build solidarity around addressing certain disparities.

“It’s just such a simple premise – that you can use the arts as a vehicle for social justice and to effect change in your community. That you can put things in place to uplift your local artists but at the same time be working to make some headway into ridiculous issues with segregation in this community. No one else was putting those two things together. They were two very separate issues and I don’t think people we’re seeing the connection,” she says.

She’s coalesced like-minded people around the mission.

“I may have been the one to stand up and wave the flag but if other people weren’t willing to fall in line with that then it never would have happened. The Union wouldn’t exist without people willing to take a leap of faith on this idea the arts can be more than just something you look at on a wall. I’m just fortunate the people with the means to help us get there also felt it a risk worth taking.

“People have made sacrifices to do this with me. Our program manager Paige Reitz took a crazy cut in salary to be here because she believed in the work I was doing. Paige was not the only staff member to take a pay cut to work with us. Actually the majority of my staff did. People willing to sacrifice something of their own to put into this dream is really how tTe Union has continued to grow.”

The Growth Campaign, which went public last summer, closed in early 2017. Its millions have helped boost employee salaries in addition to increasing the budget and solidifying things moving forward.

Public celebrations of that growth happened in October when the organization held open houses and special events at the Blue Lion. Since then, McQueen Shew and staff have been proudly welcoming visitors to their new digs and the community’s new gathering place.

Harmonious, luminescent pairing of art – “Prayer” and “Share” – on exhibit at Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery

September 12, 2016 1 comment

A harmonious, luminescent pairing of art called “Prayer” and “Share” on exhibition at the Florence Mill ArtLoft Gallery through October 10.

The show closes the 2016 ArtLoft Gallery season with an inspired “Amen.”

Pamela Jo Berry explores spirituality in mixed media and photographs. Katie Cramer explores grace and fellowship through vessels. It is an art show that feeds the spirit and nurtures the soul. A display of beautiful aesthetics and inspiring intentions by two artists in touch with their spiritual dimensions. 

Please come out and support these two Omaha artists and their heartfelt art. It is a pairing made in Heaven.

The exhibition continues through October 10.  

Gallery hours are the same as the Mill: Wed. through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm; Sunday, 10 am to 3 pm. Sundays feature a Farmers Market.

Florence Mill ArtLoft
9102 North 30th Street…Omaha
Next to I-680 & Exit 13
402-551-1233

 

fullsizerender-1

 

Artist Statement by Pamela Jo Berry for “Prayer”:
“Prayer is that down to earth conversation we have with God when we realize we are not in control and we need … want to know that God… someone greater than us is out there… right here waiting to help us with our needs, our mistakes, our direction , our provision… and is ready to give a miracle if necessary. Prayer is that sacred moment when we sit in silence… after going over every scenario with God…. exhausted, we surrender and finally listen willingly for our answers…our direction… our next step in this life. Prayer is what we do for others when we know we cannot help with what they are crying out for. Prayer is the thank you and praise we give to God for the blessings and miracles we see in our lives and the lives of others…each day. It could be a smile, a hug, a healing…favor or something that comes out of the blue to save our lives. Prayer is a community standing for one person to be healed… and it is one person standing for healing in a community without hope. Prayer can be as loud as shouting for help and as quiet as a whisper of praise or as silent as a tear of realization that we are heard. Prayer is as simple as saying ‘God are you there?'”
Pamela’s Artist Bio:
Pamela Jo Berry …. She is an artist… mixed media/ photographic. She is a writer/poet. For the last six years she has organized the North Omaha Summer Arts. She is an Omaha Native. Pamela Jo is the mother of Jesse Berry and Beaufield Berry Fisher. And she is the Gemma (grandmother) of Shine Avett Fisher… her little grandson.

img_4249

img_4246  img_4247

img_4248 img_4251

Artist Statement by Katie Cramer for “Share”
Food is the most common and diverse ways to bring people together. Sharing it is meaningful culturally and historically throughout all regions of the world. I view pottery as vessels that share not only food, but the conversation and company that occurs. Many of these items are meant to be viewed as a set. The surface and aesthetic qualities from piece to piece is completely different, just like the people sharing the experience. The fact that they are placed in the same setting is what makes them come together.
 
Katie’s Artist Bio:
Katie Cramer was born and raised in Omaha. She took her first summer pottery class when she was 10 years old and completely fell in love with clay and the potter’s wheel. Her experience at Omaha North High School heightened this adoration for ceramics and pushed her to attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she is in the process of earning her Bachelor’s of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Ceramics. She is currently a 3rd year student with full intentions of pursuing ceramics as a profession.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: