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Life Itself XVII: To All the Writers I’ve Loved Before – 25 Years of Stories About Writers and Writing

August 23, 2018 Leave a comment

Life Itself XVII:

 To All the Writers I’ve Loved Before – 25 Years of Stories About Writers and Writing

 

Noah Diaz making run for his dream at Yale School of Drama and theater companies nationwide

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/08/05/noah-diaz-making…anies-nationwide

Journalist-author Genoways takes micro and macro look at the U.S, food system

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/06/06/journalist-autho…u-s-food-syystem

Things coming full circle for Doug Marr, Phil’s Diner Series and Circle Theatre

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/04/24/things-coming-fu…d-circle-theatre/

 

 

Doug_Laura Marr

Doug Marr and wife Laura Marr

 

A book a day keeps the blues aways for avid reader and writer Ashley Xiques

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/03/03/a-book-a-day-kee…er-ashley-xiques

Voyager Bud Shaw gives up scalpel for pen

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/04/20/voyager-bud-shaw…-scalpel-for-pen

Kevin Simonson on Interviewing Hunter S. Thompson and Kurt Vonnegut

https://leoadambiga.com/2017/03/05/kevin-simonson-o…nd-kurt-vonnegut/

Literary star Ron Hansen revisits the Old West in new novel “The Kid”

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/08/25/literary-star-ro…ew-novel-the-kid/

 

Ron Hansen

 

 

Noah Diaz:

Metro theater’s man for all seasons and stages

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/07/19/noah-diaz-metro-…asons-and-stages

Old Hollywood hand living in Omaha comes out of the shadows: Screenwriter John Kaye scripted “American Hot Wax” and more

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/01/30/old-hollywood-ha…hot-wax-and-more

Bomb girl Zedeka Poindexter draws on family, food and angst for her poetry

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/03/11/zedeka-poindexte…t-for-her-poetry/

Playwright turned history detective Max Sparber turns identity search inward

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/02/07/playwright-turne…ty-search-inward/

Paul Johnsgard:

A birder’s road less traveled

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/06/24/paul-johnsgard-a…ad-less-traveled

Lew Hunter’s small town Nebraska boy made good in Hollywood story is a doozy

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/02/25/lew-hunters-smal…story-is-a-doozy

 

Hunter, Coppola B & W

Lew Hunter with Francis Ford Coppola

 

 

Alesia Lester: A Conversation in the Gossip Salon

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/03/09/alesia-lester-a-…the-gossip-salon/

Hardy’s one-man “A Christmas Carol” highlights Dickens-themed literary festival

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/11/03/hardys-one-man-a…iterary-festival/

Omaha World-Herald columnist Mike Kelly: 

A storyteller for all seasons

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/04/02/omaha-world-hera…-for-all-seasons/

 

 

Mike Kelly

Mike Kelly

 

 

Creative couple: Bob and Connie Spittler and their shared creative life 60 years in the making

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/12/23/bob-and-connie-s…rs-in-the-making/

A WASP’s racial tightrope resulted in enduring book partially set in 1960s Omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/10/28/a-wasps-racial-t…t-in-1960s-omaha/

Alex Kava:

Bestselling mystery author still going strong

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/11/03/alex-kava-bestse…ill-going-strong/

Yolonda Ross adds writer-director to actress credits; In new movies by Mamet and Sayles as her own “Breaking Night” makes festival circuit

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/02/28/yolonda-ross-add…festival-circuit/

Omahans put spin on Stephen King’s “The Shining” – Jason Levering leads stage adaptation of horror classic to benefit Benson Theatre Project

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/03/17/omahans-put-thei…-theatre-project

Omaha author Timothy Schaffert delivers again with his new novel, “The Swan Gondola”

https://leoadambiga.com/2014/03/07/omaha-author-tim…the-swan-gondola/

Timothy Schaffert is seeking materials from the 1898 Trans-Mississippi Exposition for an online archive.

Timothy Schaffert

 

The Omaha Star celebrates 75 years of black woman legacy

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/04/11/the-omaha-star-c…ack-woman-legacy/

Ex-reporter Eileen Wirth pens book on Nebraska women in journalism and their leap from society page to front page

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/03/22/ex-reporter-eile…ge-to-front-page/

Bob Hoig’s unintended entree into journalism leads to career six decades strong

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/01/25/bob-hoigs-uninte…cades-strong-now/

Wounded Knee still battleground for some per new book by journalist-author Stew Magnuson

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/04/20/wounded-knee-sti…or-stew-magnuson/

Omaha native Steve Marantz looks back at city’s ’68 racial divide through prism of hoops in new book, “The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/04/01/omaha-native-ste…of-omaha-central/

 

 

 

From the heart: Tunette Powell tells it like it is

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/03/10/from-the-heart-t…ls-it-like-it-is/

Finding her voice: Tunette Powell comes out of the dark and into the spotlight

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/01/24/finding-her-voic…to-the-spotlight/

Omowale Akintunde film “Wigger” deconstructs what race means in a faux post-racial world

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/21/deconstructing-w…ost-racial-world/

Beware the Singularity, singing the retribution blues: New works by Rick Dooling

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/10/beware-the-singu…-by-rick-dooling/

 

 

Richard Dooling's photo.

Richard Dooling

 

 

Lit Fest delves into what we fear, how we relate in extremis

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/10/09/lit-fest-delves-…late-in-extremis/

Omaha Lit Fest puts focus on Women Writers and Women in Publishing

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/10/06/omaha-lit-fest-p…en-in-publishing

Omaha Lit Fest Offers a Written Word Feast

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/10/18/omaha-lit-fest-o…itten-word-feast

Writing close to her heart: Author Joy Castro

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/11/23/author-joy-castr…in-two-new-books/

Ron Hull reviews his remarkable life in public television in new memoir

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/10/06/8945/

Ferial Pearson, award-winning educator dedicated to inclusion and social justice, helps students publish the stories of their lives

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/25/ferial-pearson-a…s-of-their-lives

Lit Fest brings author Carleen Brice back home flush with success of first novel, “Orange Mint and Honey”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/07/02/lit-fest-brings-…e-mint-and-honey/

Novel’s mother-daughter thing makes it to the screen

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/26/novel’s-mother-d…it-to-the-screen

 

 

Carleen Brice

 

 

Sun reflection: Revisiting the Omaha Sun’s Pulitzer Prize-winning expose of Boys Town

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/04/28/sun-reflection-r…ose-on-boys-town

Alexander Payne and Kaui Hart Hemmings on the symbiosis behind his film and her novel “The Descendants” and how she helped get Hawaii right

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/01/23/alexander-payne-…get-hawaii-right/

Thy kingdom come: Richard Dooling’s TV teaming with Stephen King

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/08/16/thy-kingdom-come…ith-stephen-king/

Buffalo Bill’s Coming Out Party Courtesy Author-Balladeer Bobby Bridger

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/06/buffalo-bills-co…er-bobby-bridger/

 

 

 

The Worth of Things Explored by Sean Doolittle in his New Crime Novel “The Cleanup”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/07/02/the-worth-of-thi…ovel-the-cleanup/

When Safe Isn’t Safe at All, Author Sean Doolittle Spins a Home Security Cautionary Tale

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/19/when-safe-isnt-s…-cautionary-tale/

Acclaimed Author and Nebraska New Wave Literary Leader Timothy Schaffert

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/nebraska-new-wav…imothy-schaffert/

A Man of His Words, Nebraska State Poet William Kloefkorn

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/07/a-man-of-his-wor…illiam-kloefkorn/

 

Bill and Eloise KloefkornJACOB HANNAH / Lincoln Journal Star

 

Kurt Andersen’s new novel “True Believers” revisits 1960s through reformed radical breaking her silence

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/28/kurt-andersens-n…king-her-silence/

Dissecting Jesse James

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/10/dissecting-jesse-james

Ron Hansen’s masterful outlaw blues novel about Jesse James and Robert Ford faithfully interpreted on screen

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/27/ron-hansens-mast…preted-on-screen

Playwright Carlos Murillo’s work explores personal mythmaking

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/26/playwright-carlo…sonal-mythmaking

The Many Worlds of Science Fiction Author Robert Reed

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/22/the-many-worlds-…thor-robert-reed

He knows it when he sees it: Journalist-social critic Robert Jensen finds patriarchy and white supremacy in porn

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/17/i-know-it-when-i…upremacy-in-porn

Litniks Unite! The Downtown Omaha Lit Fest brings writers, artists and readers together in celebration of the written word

Litniks Unite! The Downtown Omaha Lit Fest brings writers, artists and readers together in celebration of the written word

 

photo

Omaha Lit Fest: In praise of writers and their words: Jami Attenberg and Will Clarke among featured authors

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/19/omaha-lit-fest-i…featured-authors/

Omaha playwright Beaufield Berry comes into her own with original comedy “Psycho Ex Girlfriend”

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/04/20/omaha-playwright…iend-now-playing/

Omaha Lit Fest: “People who like this sort of thing will find this the sort of thing they like”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/07/omaha-lit-fest-p…-thing-they-like/

Martin Landau and Nik Fackler discuss working together on “Lovely, Still” and why they believe so strongly in each other and in their new film

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/09/23/martin-landau-an…-in-the-new-film/

Martin Landau and Nik Fackler

 

 

“Lovely, Still,” that rare film depicting seniors in all their humanity, earns writer-director Nik Fackler Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best First Screenplay

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/12/03/lovely-still-tha…first-screenplay/

Filmmaker Nik Fackler’s magic realism reaches the big screen in “Lovely, Still”

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/when-dreams-that…neath-do-surface

Nik Fackler, the Film Dude Establishes Himself a Major New Cinema Figure with “Lovely, Still”

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/the-film-dude-es…ew-cinema-figure/

Writers Joy Castro and Amelia Maria de la Luz Montes explore being women of color who go from poverty to privilege

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/12/writers-joy-cast…rty-to-privilege/

Being Jack Moskovitz: Grizzled former civil servant and DJ, now actor and fiction author, still waiting to be discovered

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/05/being-jack-mosko…to-be-discovered/

 

With his new novel, “The Coffins of Little Hope,” Timothy Schaffert’s back delighting in the curiosities of American Gothic

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/04/13/with-his-new-nov…-american-gothic/

Timothy Schaffert Gets Down and Dirty with his New Novel “Devils in the Sugar Shop”

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/29/timothy-schaffer…n-the-sugar-shop/

Rachel Shukert’s anything but a travel agent’s recommended guide to a European grand tour

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/05/rachel-shukerts-…opean-grand-tour/

Author Rachel Shukert: A nice Jewish girl gone wild and other regrettable stories

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/05/author-rachel-sh…rettable-stories/

 

Rachel Shukert

 

 

After whirlwind tenure as Poet Laureate, Ted Kooser goes gently back to the prairie, to where the wild plums grow

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/19/after-a-whirlwin…-wild-plums-grow/

Keeper of the Flame: Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Ted Kooser

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/19/keeper-of-the-fl…inner-ted-kooser

 

ted-kooser.jpg

Ted Kooser

 

 

Being Dick Cavett

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/12/04/being-dick-cavett-2/

Homecoming always sweet for Dick Cavett, the entertainment legend whose dreams of show biz Success were fired in Nebraska

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/12/04/homecoming-is-al…ed-in-nebraska-2/

 

Dick Cavett

 

 

Dream catcher Lew Hunter: Screenwriting guru of the Great Plains

http://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/09/dream-catcher-lew-hunter/

Q & A with playwright Caridad Svich, featured artist at Great Plains Theatre Conference

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/02/a-q-a-with-playw…eatre-conference/

Featured Great Plains Theatre Conference playwright Caridad Svich explores bicultural themes

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/29/featured-great-p…icultural-themes

Playwright-screenwriter John Guare talks shop on Omaha visit celebrating his acclaimed “Six Degrees of Separation”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/02/playwright-john-…es-of-separation/

Attention must be paid: Arthur Kopit invokes Arthur Miller to describe Great Plains Theatre Conference focus on the work of playwrights

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/29/attention-must-b…s-and-their-work/

Q & A with Edward Albee: His thoughts on the Great Plains Theatre Conference, Jo Ann McDowell, Omaha and preparing a new generation of playwrights

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/29/a-q-a-with-edwar…n-of-playwrights/

Great Plains Theatre Conference ushers in new era of Omaha theater

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/28/great-plains-the…of-omaha-theater/

 

John Guare

 

 

Hard times ring sweet in the soulful words of singer-songwriter-author Laura Love, daughter of the late jazz man, Preston Love Sr.

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/01/hard-times-ring-…uthor-laura-love

Gospel playwright Llana Smith enjoys her Big Mama’s time

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/07/gospel-playwrigh…r-big-mamas-time

Blizzard Voices:

Stories from the Great White Shroud

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/07/27/blizzard-voices-…eat-white-shroud

Click Westin, back in the screenwriting game again at age 83

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/11/click-westin-bac…-again-at-age-83/

“The Bagel: An Immigrant’s Story” – Joan Micklin Silver and Matthew Goodman team up for new documentary

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/16/the-bagel-an-imm…documentary-film

Actor Peter Riegert makes fine feature directorial debut with “King of the Corner”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/12/actor-peter-rieg…ng-of-the-corner/

Talking screenwriting with Hollywood heavyweight Hawk Ostby: Omaha Film Festival panelist counts “Children of Men” and “Iron Man” among credits

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/03/02/talking-screenwr…mong-his-credits/

 

Hawk Ostby

 

 

Tempting fate: Patrick Coyle film “Into Temptation” delivers gritty tale of working girl and idealistic priest in search of redemption

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/04/09/tempting-fate-pa…ch-of-redemption/

Otis Twelve’s Radio Days

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/31/otis-twelves-radio-days/

Three old wise men of journalism – Hlavacek, Michaels and Desfor – recall their foreign correspondent careers and reflect on the world today

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/three-old-wise-men-of-journalism/

John and Pegge Hlavacek’s globe-trotting adventures as foreign correspondents

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/02/john-and-pegge-h…n-correspondents/

 

 

John Hlavacek

 

 

Preston Love: His voice will not be stilled

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/03/preston-love-his…l-not-be-stilled/ 

 

Marguerita Washington: The woman behind the Star that never sets

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/02/marguerita-washi…-that-never-sets

“Walking Behind to Freedom” – A musical theater examination of race

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/21/walking-behind-t…mination-of-race

Sacred Trust, Author Ron Hansen’s Fiction Explores Moral Struggles

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/06/sacred-trust

Jim Taylor, the other half of Hollywood’s top screenwriting team, talks about his work with Alexander Payne

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/06/30/jim-taylor-the-o…lexander-payne-2/

Author, humorist, folklorist Roger Welsch tells the stories of the American soul and soil

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/19/author-humorist-…he-american-soul/

 

From the Archives: Warren Francke – A passion for journalism, teaching and life

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/11/from-the-archive…eaching-and-life

Author Scott Muskin – What’s a nice Jewish boy like you doing writing about all this mishigas?

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/12/05/author-scott-mus…ll-this-mishigas/

Vincent Alston’s indie film debut, “For Love of Amy,” is black and white and love all over

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/11/29/vincent-alstons-…nd-love-all-over

Screenwriting adventures of Nebraska native Jon Bokenkamp, author of the scripts “Perfect Stranger” and “Taking Lives'”

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/11/28/screenwriting-ad…ve-jon-bokenkamp/

 Taking Lives

Murder He Wrote: Reporter-author David Krajicek finds niche as true crime storyteller

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/10/28/murder-he-wrote-…rime-storyteller/

Bobby Bridger’s Rendezvous

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/11/bobby-bridgers-rendezvous/

Nancy Duncan: Her final story

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/09/her-final-story/

Nancy Duncan: Storyteller

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/02/nancy-duncan-storyteller/

From the Archives:

Nancy Duncan’s journey to storytelling took circuitous route

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/04/01/from-the-archive…circutious-route

Joan Micklin Silver: Maverick filmmaker helped shape American independent film scene and opened doors for women directors

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/10/joan-micklin-sil…-women-directors/

Joan Micklin Silver: Shattering cinema’s glass ceiling

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/shattering-cinemas-glass-ceiling/

Joan Micklin Silver

 

 

Doug Marr, Diner Theater and keeping the faith

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/06/doug-marr-keeping-the-faith/

Short story writer James Reed at work in the literary fields of the imagination

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/03/short-story-writ…-the-imagination

Culturalist Kurt Andersen wryly observes the American scene as author, essayist, radio talk show host

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/culturalist-kurt-andersen/

Slaying dragons: Author Richard Dooling’s sharp satire cuts deep and quick

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/18/slaying-dragons-rick-dooling/

 

K

Kurt Andersen

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Hispanic Authors-Artists Part of Omaha Lit Fest Experience

August 8, 2018 Leave a comment

Hispanic Authors-Artists Part of Omaha Lit Fest Experience

©by Leo Adam Biga

Originally published in El Perico (el-pericp.com)

 

The September 10-11, 2010 (downtown) Omaha Lit Fest gathers authors and artists to investigate the theme Curiouser & Curiouser: The Book in Flux.

Some guests, like University of Nebraska-Lincoln Ph.D. candidate Sarah Chavez, are Hispanic, Others, like first-time festival panelist Peter Kuper of Manhattan, New York, are not, but explore Hispanic themes.

Nebraska native Belinda Acosta, the Latina author of two Quinceanera Club novels, was a panelist last year and the Austin, Texas resident would like to come back again.

Chavez, a Fresno, Calif. native poet, has completed a chapbook she’s expanding into a full-length volume. This will be her first Omaha Lit Fest. She read some of her original work at an August 26 preview. She looks forward to the fest, saying she’s “impressed” by the supportive literary community here and by the diversity and quality of writers presenting at area lit events.

In her poetry Chavez explores the working class character of Fresno. She also explores borders and boundaries of identity. Her father is a first generation Mexican-American migrant worker. As a girl she joined her father laboring in the fields. Her Irish-American mother comes from upper middle class roots.

Chavez said by phone, “I was always sort of aware of this transferring back and forth between cultures. My parents divorced fairly early on, so I was always going back and forth, crossing like city and cultural borders, learning you act like this in this environment but then you can act like this in this other environment.

“So I was always aware of this mobility and the tenuous nature of environment. I was also aware of being, like my sister and I joke, ‘half breeds.’ Because of that mix we’re able to pass in different areas. I go to minority programs and have cultural cachet as a Mexican there but then people don’t automatically assume I am of that heritage. I don’t quite fit, I don’t look like this but I don’t feel like this other group.”

She considers different cultural expectations attending Latinas or African-American women and white women. She examines what it means for women of color to move away from traditional domestic duties to inhabit professional and academic roles.

Curiouser and curiouser.

Political cartoonist and illustrator.Kuper anticipated a two-year siesta in Oaxaca, Mexico with his wife and daughter, but when a teachers’ strike there was violently put down by government forces, he went from casual tourist to engaged reporter. His visceral Diario de Oaxaca journal sketches and commentaries capture how nature and civilization, history and modernity, bounty and deprivation are intertwined there.

He prized playing the role of first-hand witness and participant. In a phone interview he said this active, intimate experience “made it feel we were inside of Mexico rather than standing on the edge regarding it from a slight distance.” He said when he first arrived he made up for his “lousy” Spanish by using his sketches to communicate with people, adding that his habit of walking the streets offered interactions that drew him deeper into local rituals and customs.

His work expresses the surreal-like quality of nature run riot amid a busy tourist trade, an oppressive regime, crushing poverty and citizen protests.

“It’s fascinating. I kept on feeling I was walking through a metaphor.”

Perhaps most striking to him is how people risk everything to oppose an unjust ruling class. He’s quite taken by the politicized street art there. He’s also impressed by how every day people make art an expressive part of their life, whether arranging flower and candle homages for Day of the Dead festivities or painting murals.

“There’s so much creating of art that goes on in daily life as a natural thing to do,” he said. “It really gives me a sense of art having purpose, enriching and playing a role.”

He said the whole experience shook him up artistically, putting him on a different track once he returned home.

“It challenged and opened me up to trying different approaches. I had to sort of reinvent myself with the new information.”

Acosta grew up in Lincoln. She was active in Omaha theater, helping found the Center Stage Theatre and touring a one-woman show on Midwestern Latinas, before attending the University of Texas at Austin to focus on writing.

A freelance journalist by trade, she’s a contributing writer for the Austin Chronicle and Texas Observer. Her books Damas, Dramas, and Ana Ruiz and Sisters, Strangers, and Starting Over chart family relationships within the backdrop of the quinceanera, which she finds ironic since she never had a quince herself. But she said she researched the coming-of-age celebration in preparation for her books.

She’s presently working on a new book set in Nebraska.

For event details, visit www.omahalitfest.com.

Her mother’s daughter:  Charlene Butts Ligon carries on civil rights legacy of her late mother Evelyn Thomas Butts

January 28, 2018 2 comments

Her mother’s daughter: 

Charlene Butts Ligon carries on civil rights legacy of her late mother Evelyn Thomas Butts

©by Leo Adam Biga

Appearing in February 2018 issue of the New Horizons

 

Chances are, you’ve never heard of the late Evelyn T. Butts. But you should know this grassroots warrior who made a difference at the height of the civil rights movement in the Jim Crow American South.

A new book, Fearless: How a poor Virginia seamstress took on Jim Crow, beat the poll tax and changed her city forever, written by her youngest daughter, Charlene Butts Ligon of Bellevue, Neb. preserves the legacy of this champion for the underserved and underrepresented.

Defying odds to become civil rights champion

Evelyn (Thomas) Butts grew up with few advantages in Depression Era Virginia. She lost her mother at 10. She didn’t finish high school. Her husband Charlie Butts came home from World War II one hundred percent disabled. To support their three daughters, Butts, a skilled seamstress, took in day work. She made most of her girls’ clothes.

When not cooking, cleaning, caring for the family, she volunteered her time fighting for equal rights, She became an unlikely force in Virginia politics wielding influence in her hometown of Norfolk and beyond. Both elected officials and candidates curried her favor.

She fought for integrated schools, equal city services and fair housing. Her biggest fight legally challenged the poll tax, a registration fee that posed enough of a financial burden to keep many poor blacks from  exercising their right to cast a ballot. The Twenty-fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution had ruled poll taxes illegal in federal elections but the practice continued in southern state elections as a way to disenfranchise blacks. Butts’ case, combined with others. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. in 1966, Thurgood Marshall argued for the plaintiffs. In a 6-3 decision, the court abolished the poll tax in state elections and Butts went right to work registering thousands of voters.

Devoted daughter documents mom’s legacy in book

More than 50 years since that decision and 25 years since her mother’ death in 1993, Ligon has written and published a book that chronicles Evelyn Butts’ life of public service that inspired her and countless others.

Ligon and her husband Robert are retired U.S. Air Force officers. The last station of their well-traveled military careers was at Offutt Air Force Base from 1992 to 1995. When they retired, the couple opted to make Nebraska their permanent home. They are parents to three grown children and five grandchildren.

By nature and nurture, Ligon, inherited her “mama’s” love of organized politics, community affairs and public service. She’s chair of the Sarpy County Democrats and secretary of the Nebraska State Democratic Party. As the party’s state caucus chair, she led a nationally recognized effort that set up caucuses in all 93 counties and developed an interactive voting info website.

Former Nebraska Democratic Party executive director Hadley Richters knows a good egg when she sees one.

“In politics, you learn quickly the people who will actually do the work are few, and even fewer are those who strive to do it even better than before. Charlene Ligon is definitely a part of that very few. I have also learned those few, like Charlene, are who truly uphold our democracy. Charlene works tirelessly to further participation in the process, selflessly driven by rare and deep understanding of what’s at stake. She is a champion for voices to be heard, and when it comes to protecting the democratic process, defending fairness, demanding access, and advocating for what is right, I can promise you Charlene will be present, consistent, hard-working and fearless.”

Ligon is a charter member of Black Women for Positive Change, a national policy-focused network whose goals are to strengthen and expand the American middle-working class and change the culture of violence.

Besides her mother, she counts as role models: Barbara Jordan, Shirley Chisholm and Dorothy Height.

In addition to participating in lots of political rallies, she’s an annual Omaha Women’s March participant.

Like her mother before her. she’s been a Democratic National Convention delegate, she’s met party powerbrokers and she’s made voting rights her mission.

“It all goes back to that – access and fairness. That’s how I see it.”

Even today, measures such as redistricting and extreme voter ID requirements can be used to suppress votes. She still finds it shocking the lengths Virginia and other states went to in order to suppress the black vote.

“Virginia’s really shameful in the way it did voting,” she said. “At one time, they had what they called a blank sheet for registration. When you went to register to vote you had to know ahead of time what identifying information you needed to put on there. It wasn’t a literacy test. By law, the registrar could not help people, so people got disqualified. Well, the black community got together and started having classes to educate folks what they needed to know when they went to register.”

The blank sheet was on top of the poll tax. An unintended effect was the disqualification of poor and elderly whites, too. In a majority white state, that could not hold and so a referendum was organized and the practice discontinued.

“The history books tell you they did it because of white backlash, not because of black backlash,” Ligon said.

Virginia’s regerettable record of segregation extended to entire school districts postponing school and some schools closing rather than complying with integration

“It always amazes me they did that,” she said.

 

Speaking her mind and giving others a voice

As a Norfolk public housing commissioner, Butts broke ranks with fellow board members to publicly oppose private and public redevelopment plans whose resulting gentrification would threaten displacing black residents.

“She really gave them a fit because they weren’t doing what they should have been doing for poor neighborhoods and she told them about it. They weren’t really ready for her to bring this out,” Ligon said of her mother’s outspoken independence.

“Mama could be stubborn, too. She was authoritarian sometimes.”

Butts became the voice for people needing an advocate.

“They called her for all kinds of things. They called her when they needed a house, when they were having problems with their landlord. They called her and called her. They knew to call Mrs. Butts and that if you call Mrs. Butts, she’ll help you. Nine times out of ten she could get something for them. She had that reputation as a mover and shaker and they knew she wasn’t going to sell them out because it wasn’t about money for her.”

Ligon fights the good fight herself in a different climate than the one her mother operated in. It makes her appreciate even more how her mom took on social issues when it was dangerous for an African-American to speak out. She admires the courage her mother showed and the feminist spirit she embodied.

“My mama always spoke up. She didn’t cow. She talked kind of loud. I got that from her. She looked them in the eye and said, ‘Yeah, this is the way it needs to be.’ They didn’t always pay attention to her, but she just always was ready to say what needed to be said.  Of course, the establishment didn’t want to hear it. But she actually won most people’s respect.”

Growing up, Ligon realized having such a bigger-than-life mother was not the norm.

“She stood out in my life. I started to understand that my mom was different than most people’s moms. She was always doing something for the neighborhood. There were so many things going on in the 1950s through the early 1960s that really got her going.”

Her mother was at the famous 1963 March on Washington, where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. Charlene wanted to go but her mother forbade it out of concern there might be violence. Being there marked a milestone for Evelyn – surpassed only by the later Supreme Court victory.

“It meant a lot to her. That was the movement. That was what she believed,” Ligon said. “And it was historic.”

Long before the march, Butts saw MLK speak in Petersburg, Virginia. He became her personal hero.

“She was already moving forward, but he inspired her to move further forward.”

Decades later, Ligon attended both of Obama’s presidential inaugurations. She has no doubt her mother would have been there if she’d been alive.

“I wish my mom could have been around to see that, although electing the nation’s first black president didn’t have the intended effect on America I thought it would. It gave me faith though when he was elected that the process works, that it could happen. He could not have won with just black votes, so we know a lot of white people voted for him. We should never forget that.

“It just really made me proud.”

Ligon shook hands with President Obama when he visited the metro. She’s met other notable Democrats, such as Joe Biden, Hilary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Jim Clybern, Doug Wilder, Ben Nelson and Bob Kerrey.

The day the Supreme Court struck down the poll tax, her mother got to meet Thurgood Marshall – the man who headed up the Brown vs. Board of Education legal team that successfully argued for school desegregation.

“She was really thrilled to meet him.”

Then-U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy was in the courtroom for the poll tax ruling and Evelyn got to meet the future presidential candidate that day as well.

Butts was vociferous in her pursuit of justice but not everyone in the movement could afford to be like her.

“As I look back on the other prominent people in the movement,” Ligon said, “they had their ways of contributing but there were a lot of people who had what they considered something to lose. For instance, teachers just wouldn’t say a word because they were afraid for their jobs. There were lots of people that wouldn’t say anything.”

Her mother exuded charisma that drew people to her.

“People liked her. Mama was an organizer. She was the person that got them all together and she was inspirational to them, I’m sure. She had a group of ladies who followed her. They were like, “Okay. Mrs. Butts, what are we going to do today? Are we going to register voters? Are we going to picket?”

Evelyn Butts formed an organization called Concerned Citizens for Political Education that sought to empower blacks and their own self-determination. It achieved two key victories in the late 1960s with the election of Joseph A. Jordan as Norfolk’s first black city council member since Reconstruction and electing William P. Robinson as the city’s first African-American member of the state House of Delegates.

Charlene marveled at her mother’s energy and industriousness.

“I was always proud of her.”

Having such a high profile parent wasn’t a problem.

“I never felt uncomfortable or had a negative feeling about it.”

Even when telling others what she felt needed to be done, Ligon said her mother “treated everybody with respect,” adding “The Golden Rule has always been my thing and I’m sure my mom taught me the Golden Rule.”

Telling the story from archives and memories

As big a feat as it was to end the poll tax, Ligon felt her mother’s accomplishments went far beyond that and that only a book could do them justice. So, in 2007, she and her late sister Jeanette, embarked on the project.

“We thought people needed lo know the whole story.”

Ligon’s research led her to acclaimed journalist-author Earl Swift, a former Virginian Pilot reporter who wrote about her mother. He ended up editing the book. He insisted she make it more specific and full of descriptive details. Poring through archives, Ligon found much of her mother’s activities covered in print stories published by the Pilot as well as by Norfolk’s black newspaper, the New Journal and Guide. Ligon also interviewed several people who knew her mother or her work.

Writer Kietryn Zychal helped Ligon pen the book.

Much of the content is from Charlene and her sister’s vivid memories growing up with their mom’s activism. As a girl, Charlene often accompanied her to events.

“She took me a lot of places. I was exposed.”

Those experiences included picketing a local grocery store that didn’t hire blacks and a university whose athletics stadium restricted blacks to certain sections

“The first time i remember attending a political-social activism meeting with Mama was the Oakwood Civic League about 1955 during the same time the area was under annexation by the city of Norfolk. My next memory is attending the NAACP meeting at the church on the corner from our house concerning testing to attend integrated schools. I have vivid memories of attending the court proceedings of a school desegregation case. Mama took me to court every day. She was called to testify by the NAACP lawyers.”

Charlene joined other black teenage girls as campaign workers under the name the Jordanettes, for candidate Joe Jordan. Her mom made their matching outfits.

“We passed out literature, campaign buttons, bumper stickers at picnics, rallies and meetings. Hanging out with my mom and doing the campaign stuff definitely had an influence. I was always excited to tag along.”

At home, politics dominated family discussions.

“My mom did what she did all the time and she talked about it all the time, and so I always knew what was going on, She involved us. She would update my dad. We were always in earshot of the conversation. My sisters and I were expected to be aware of what was happening in our community. We were encouraged to read the newspaper. We participated in some picketing.”

Always having Evelyn’s back was the man of the house.

“He was behind her a hundred percent,” Ligon said of her father, who unlike Evelyn was quiet and reserved. He didn’t like the limelight but, Charlene said, “he never fussed about that – he was in her corner.”

“He might not have done that (activism) personally himself but yeah he was proud she was out there doing that. As long as she cooked his dinner.”

Because Evelyn Butts was churched, she saw part of her fighting the good fight as the Christian thing to do.

“We attended church but my mama wasn’t really a church lady. She just always believed in what the right thing to do would be. I guess that inner thing was in all of us as far as social justice.

“She taught me there wasn’t anything I couldn’t do if I put my mind to it. She taught me not to be afraid of people because I was different.”

When it came time for Ligon to title her book, the word fearless jumped out.

“That’s what she was.”

Where did that fearless spirit come from?

After her mother died, she was raised by her politically engaged aunt Roz. But headstrong Evelyn took her activism to a whole other level.

“I remember Roz telling mama to be careful. She said, ‘Evelyn, you better watch out, they’re going to kill you.'”

The threat of violence, whether implied or stated, was ever present.

“That’s just the way it was. In Virginia, we had some bad things happen, but it wasn’t like Mississippi and the civil rights workers getting killed. We had a few bombings and cross burnings. It still amazes me how she was able to put up with what she did. A lot of people were frightened. Not far from where we lived. racists were bombing houses near where she was picketing. She wasn’t frightened about that and she always made us feel comfortable that things were going to be okay.”

Butts drew the ire of those with whom she differed, white and black. For example, she called out the Virginia chapter of the NAACP for moving too slowly and timidly.

“My mom was considered militant back in the day, but she was also pragmatic about it. There was so much ground to cover. There’s still a lot of ground to cover.”

 

Progress won and lost in a never-ending struggle

Ligon rues that today’s youth may not appreciate how fragile civil rights are, especially with Donald Trump in office and the Republicans in control of Congress.

“I don’t think young people realize we’re losing ground. They aren’t paying attention. They take things for granted, I’m old enough to remember when everything was segregated and how restrictive it was. I may not want to go anywhere then someplace where all the people look like me, but I need to have that choice.

“We’ve lost almost all the ground we made when Barack Obama was president. People who wanted change said we don’t need the status quo and I would say, yes we do, we need to hold it a little bit.”

She’s upset Obama executive orders are under assail. Protections for DACA recipients are set to end pending a compromise plan. Obamacare is being undone. Sentences for nonviolent drug offenders are being toughened and lengthened.

Perhaps it’s only natural the nation’s eyes were taken off the prize once civil rights lost an identifiable movement or leader. But Ligon chose a Corretta Scott King quotation at the front of her book as a reminder that when it comes to preserving rights, vigilance is needed.

Struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really won –you earn it in every generation.

“I think the struggle is always going to be there for us minorities, specifically for African-Americans,” Ligon said. “It’s my belief we’re always going to have it. Each generation has to continue to move forward. You can’t just say, ‘We have it now.'”

She’s concerned some African-Americans have grown disillusioned by the overt racism that’s surfaced since Trump emerged as a serious presidential candidate and then won the White House.

“With the change that’s happened in the United States, I think a lot of them have lost faith. They seem to have given up. They say America is white people’s country. I remind them it’s our country. Do you know how much blood sweat and tears African-Americans have invested in America? Somewhere down the line we did not instill that this is our country. It’s okay to be patriotic and call them out every day. You can do both.”

How might America be different had MLK lived?

“Hopefully, we would be a little bit further along in having a more organized movement,” said Ligon.

She’s distressed a segment of whites feel the gains made by blacks have come at their expense.

“Some white people feel something has been taken from them and given to the minorities, which is sad, because it’s not really so. But they feel that way.”

She feels the election of Trump represented “a backlash” to the Obama presidency and his legacy as a progressive black man in power.

If her mother were around today, Charlene is sure she would be out registering voters and getting them to the polls to ensure Trump and those like him don’t get reelected or elected in the first place.

In her book’s epilogue, Charlene suggests people stay home from the polls because they believe politics is corrupt and dirty but she asserts Mama Butts would have something to say about that.

If my mother could, I know she’d say this: If you don’t vote, you can be assured that corrupt politicians will be elected.

“And that’s the truth,” Ligon said.

Drawing strength from a deep well

Just where did her mother get the strength to publicly resist oppression?

“It probably came from a long line of strong women. My grandmother’s sisters, including Roz, who raised my mom, and women from the generation before. The men, I suspect, were pretty strong too. You just had to know my mom and the other family ladies, and the conclusion would be something was in the genes that made them fighters. They were fighters, no doubt. They all were civic-minded, too.”

Going back even earlier in the family tree reveals a burning desire for freedom and justice.

“My great-great-grandfather Smallwood Ackiss was a slave who ran away from the plantation during the Civil War after the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and went to Norfolk. He went on to fight for the Union for two years,” Ligon said. “In 1865, he came back to the plantation. John Ackiss II, who was the plantation owner and his owner, had been fighting for the Confederacy at the same time. We do know Smallwood was given 30 acres of land. He lost the property, but we still have a family cemetery there that’s now on a country club in a real exclusive area of Virginia Beach.”

From Smallwood right on down to her mother and herself, Charlene is part of a heritage that embraces freedom and full participation in the democratic process.

“I guess I was always interested and Mom always took me with her. I always saw it. Even in the military, when stationed in South Dakota, I chaired the NAACP Freedom Fund in Rapid City.

“It’s always been there.”

She feels her time in the service prepared her to take charge of things.

“The military strengthens leadership. It’s geared for you to get promoted to become a leader.”

Then there’s the fact she is her mother’s daughter.

Entering the service in the first place – as a 26-year-old single mother of two young children – illustrated her own strong-willed independence. It was 1975 and the newly initiated all-volunteer military was opening long-denied opportunities for women.

“I was divorced, had two kids and I needed child care and a regular salary. I didn’t want to have to depend on anyone else for it but me. It was difficult entering the military as a single parent, but I saw it as security for me and my kids. I was really fortunate I met a great guy whom I married and we managed to finish out our careers together.”

Ligon made master sergeant. She worked as a meteorologist.

“I didn’t want a traditional job. I didn’t want to be an administrative clerk in an office.”

She ended her career as a data base programmer and since her retirement she’s done web development work. She also had her own lingerie boutique, Intimate Creations, at Southroads Mall. Democratic Party business takes up most of her time these days.

Charlene’s military veteran father died in 1979. He supported her decision to serve her country.

Bittersweet end and redemption 

While off in the military, Charlene wasn’t around to witness her mother falling out of favor with a new regime of leaders who distanced themselves from her. Mama Butts lost bids for public office and was even voted out of the Concerned Citizens group she founded. This, after having received community service awards and being accorded much attention.

Personality conflicts and turf wars come with the territory in politics.

“For a long time, my mom didn’t let those things stop her.”

Then it got to be too much and Evelyn dropped out.

Upon her death, Earl Swift wrote:

Evelyn Butts’ life had become a Shakespearean tragedy. She’d dived from the heights of power to something very close to irrelevance. This is someone who should have finished life celebrated, rather than forgotten. History better be kind to this woman. Evelyn Butts was important.

The family agreed her important legacy needed rescue from the political power grabs that tarnished it.

“The Democratic Party really was not nice to my mom. That was another reason I wrote the book – because I wanted that to be known,” Charlene said. “I didn’t know all that had gone on until 1993 when she died. I wanted to present who she was. how she came to be that way and the lessons you can learn from her life. I think those lessons are really important for young people because we need to move forward, we need to stay focused and know that we can’t give up – the struggle is still there.

“People need to vote. That’s what they really need to do. They need to participate. Voting is their force and they don’t realize it, and that’s really disheartening. Even in Norfolk, my hometown, the registered voter numbers  and turnout for elections among blacks is horrible – just like it is here. In north and south Omaha, they don’t turn out the way they could – 10 to 15 percent less than the rest of the city. That should not be.

“When John Ewing ran for Congress he lost by one and a half points. A little bit of extra turnout in North Omaha would have put him over the top. The same thing happened when Brenda Council ran for mayor of the City of Omaha. If they had turned out for Brenda, Brenda would have been elected. That discourages me because they feel like they’re only a small percentage of the population. Yes, it’s true, but you can still make a difference and when you make that difference that gives you a voice. When you can swing an election, candidates and elected officials pay attention. When black voters say ‘they don’t care about us,’ well I guess not, if you don’t have a voice.”

If anything, the work of Evelyn Butts proved what a difference one person can make in building a collective of activated citizens to make positive change.

To Ligon’s delight, her mother is fondly remembered and people want to promote her legacy. A street and community center are named after her. A church houses a tribute display. Endorsements for the book came from former Virginia governor and senator Chuck Robb and current Norfolk mayor Kenneth Cooper Alexander, who wrote the foreword.

Ligon was back home in Norfolk in January for a book signing in conjunction with MLK Day. She’s back there again for more book signings in February for Black History Month.

In Omaha, Fearless is available at The Bookworm, other fine bookstores and select libraries.

Fittingly, the book has been warmly received by diverse audiences. Long before intersectionality became a thing, Ligon writes in her book, her mother practiced it.

She was black. She was a woman. She was poor. She had dropped out of high school. She was overweight and she spoke loudly with confidence in her opinions in a voice that disclosed her working-class, almost rural upbringing. But this large, black poor woman was in the room with politically powerful white people, making policy and advocating for the poor, and it drove some suit-wearing, educated, well-heeled, middle-class male ministers nuts. Some wanted her place. Or, they believed her place should be subservient to a man.

When her public career ended, my mother retreated to private life … She occupied her time by being a mother, a grandmother, a caregiver, a homemaker and a fantastic cook. To say that her post-political years were tragic is to miss how much strength and satisfaction she drew from those roles. She may have retreated, but she was not defeated.

We will never come to consensus on why Evelyn Butts lost her political power. There will always be people in Norfolk who thought her ‘style’ made her unelectable, that she brought about her own demise … Whatever her failings, her legacy is not in dispute. She will always exist in the pages of the U.S. Supreme Court case, in brick and mortar buildings that she helped to create, and in the memories of people …

For me, her last surviving daughter, Evelyn Butts will always be a great American hero.

If there’s a final lesson Charlene said she’s taken from her mother it’s that “there are things bigger than yourself to fight for – and so I do what I do for my kids and grandkids.”

She’s sure her mom would be proud she followed in her footsteps to become a much decorated Democratic Party stalwart and voting rights champion.

“I haven’t thought about a legacy for myself. I hope people will remember me as a hard worker and as a pragmatic, fair fighter for social justice and civil rights.”

Visit evelyntbutts.com or http://www.facebook.com/evelyntbutts.

 

‘Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film’ book signing meet and greet @ Our Bookstore

November 7, 2017 Leave a comment

“Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film”

Book signing meet and greet

@Our Bookstore, Old Market Passageway

Monday, Nov. 13

5-7 p.m.

 

 

 

This Fall is a cinema showcase to remember in Nebraska: 

•Omaha’s own Alexander Payne will be back in December with his new movie, “Downsizing.” The sci-fi satire shot a few days in Omaha with stars Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig.  
 
•The Oscar-winner’s film will premiere at Omaha’s last remaining neighborhood movie house, the historic Dundee Theater, where his silver screen dreams were stirred and his first feature, “Citizen Ruth,” played. 
•The renovated landmark is beginning a new life under the management of Film Streams. Check out my New Horizons cover story about this return engagement for the ages in the Nov. issue.
 
•Through my work as an Omaha film journalist, I’ve created a book celebrating the writer-director’s creative process: “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film.” The new edition features expanded content.
 
•Join me for a book signing meet & greet @ Our Bookstore: Monday, Nov. 13, Old Market Passageway, 5-7 p.m.. Hor dourves and refreshments will be served.
•The $25.95 book makes a great gift for film lovers. 
 
Hope to see you there.
 
 

2017 Nebraska Book Festival: Saturday, July 15 in Lincoln


Source: Announcing the Nebraska Book Festival

I am proud to be a part of the 2017 Nebraska Book Festival this weekend in Lincoln’s Union Plaza. The Saturday, July 15 event is an all-day (9 a.m. to 6 p.m.) celebration of the written word featuring presentations by several Nebraska authors, including yours truly. As the following description explains, I will share my writer’s life as an author-journalist-blogger. Since the figure and subject of Alexander Payne plays a prominent part in my career, I will discuss my book “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film” and sign copies of it.

2:15-3:15 p.m.
Jane Snyder Trails Center
“My Adventures as a Nonfiction Book Author, Freelance Journalist and Compulsive Blogger” with Leo Adam Biga

Sponsored by Nebraska Writers Guild

Veteran Omaha writer Leo Adam Biga has done a little of everything in his career. He started in public relations in the arts and athletics fields, then became a freelance journalist for business and health publications. His work today as a contributing writer for newspapers, magazines and online sites ranges across many topics – from boxing to books and movies to food to social justice issues. His extensive work on Oscar-winning filmmaker Alexander Payne is the basis of his book Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film, one of a handful of books that Biga has written. He will share insights into what the life of a full-time writer entails, including its challenges, rewards and opportunities.

Click links for the complete schedule of author presentations and festival events and activities.

I hope to see some of my Lincoln friends there. And if any of you from Omaha can make it, so much the better.

Wish I could make it to the festival kick-off party the evening of Friday, July 14, but my schedule won’t allow it. Hope to see you there on Saturday.

NBF_Flyer_Final2

FREELANCE WRITING ACADEMY SEMINAR – Now Taking Bookings


FREELANCE WRITING ACADEMY SEMINAR – Now Taking Bookings
Presented by Leo Adam Biga

Author of “Alexander Payne: His Journey in Film,” “Crossing Bridges: A Priest’s Uplifting Life Among the Downtrodden,” “Nebraska Methodist College at 125: Scaling New Heights”

Contributing writer to The Reader, Omaha Magazine, Metro Magazine. New Horizons, Food & Spirits Magazine

Blogger at Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories and My Inside Stories
“I write stories about people, their passions and their magnificent obsessions”

For all you emerging and aspiring writers out there, I offer a 3-hpur Freelance Writing Academy Seminar at a reasonable group rate.

Perhaps your rotary or sororiety or other community organization would like to have me present. Or perhaps your local public library branch, book store. school, church or book club would like to schedule me.

The seminar is based on what I have done and learned as a full-time author-journalist-blogger and how it might apply to your own writing goals.

Now taking bookings.

My presentation will cover:
•Preparing yourself to be a writer
•Finding your writer’s voice
•Cultivating story ideas
•Pitching and marketing your work
•Developing and maintaining a client base
•Getting published
•Supplementing your income and even making a living as a freelancer

I leave plenty of time for queations and discussion.

Together, let’s activate and maximize your writing life.

For details, price and bookings, Inbox me or email me at leo32158@cox.net or call me at 402-445-4666.

North Omaha Summer Arts – Women’s Writing 7


Our 7th summer of North Omaha Summer Arts (NOSA) is just around the corner and we cannot wait to serve you all.

Our first class is Women’s Writing 7 – “A further journey into Being Published”
Held weekly on Wednesdays, beginning June 7th and running through July 26th.

All events are free and open to the entire community.

See details by clicking the poster below.

 

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