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Jazz to the Future – The Revitalization of a Scene

July 3, 2019 2 comments

JAZZ to the Future illustration

 

Jazz to the Future – The Revitalization of a Scene

story by Leo Adam Biga

Illustration by Derek Joy

Originally appeared in the July 2019 issue of Omaha Magazine (omahamagazine.com/articles/jazz-to-the-future)

 

Legacy Informs Revival

Veteran drummer Curly Martin came of age in the ‘50s and ‘60s, when North O brimmed with players and venues. Today, he’s a flashpoint for shedding light on the history and making jazz relevant again. He is adamant “you can’t be taught jazz or blues.”

“We had mentors. Preston Love was one of my biggest mentors. I was a junior in high school, 16 years old, when I got the gig with his band. I got permission to go on the road and said bye to Tech High.”

He insists the only way to learn is to “just hang out and play, man.”

“My whole thing is about the music and passing on the knowledge,” says Martin, who’s forming a foundation to mentor youth, The Martin Mentoring Lab. He’s presented jazz labs at Hi-Fi House in the Blackstone District and is doing the same at The Jewell in the Capitol District.

“I believe the audience is in Omaha—they just don’t know what they’ve been missing because it’s been gone for so long,” says Kate Dussault, formerly of Hi-Fi House. “Omaha has this really unique opportunity right now, which is why we’re creating this foundation as a place where people can come and learn by osmosis.”

In Martin, Dussault found a kindred spirit.

“He reveres jazz like I do—as black classical music. Curly’s determined to bring jazz back to Omaha and [Hi-Fi House is] doing everything we can to help him.”

His son Terrace Martin, a noted musician and producer in Los Angeles, is leading a similar charge on the coast. 

“It’s a whole new clique going on,” Curly says. “All these young musicians catching hold and putting all this together—passing the work and knowledge around.”

The Grammy-nominated album Velvet Portraits, featuring Curly and Terace, was recorded at producer Rick Carson’s Omaha-based Make Believe Studios. Carson says Terrace, with artists like Kamasi Washington and Robert Glasper, are leading “a jazz resurgence,” adding, “The jazz they’re playing isn’t straight-ahead jazz, it’s this jazz mix-up of hip hop, funk, R&B, and soul.”

“Terrace is sitting right at the nexus of hip hop and jazz,” Dussault says. “He’s a sought-after producer who works with Kendrick Lamar and Herbie Hancock. He’s part of that whole crew bringing this new sort of jazz and making playing jazz cool again to young people.”

That synergy travels to Omaha in work Terrace, Curly, and others do at Hi-Fi, Make Believe, Holland Performing Arts Center, and The Jewell. None of this new activity may have happened, Dussault notes, if Martin hadn’t asked Hi-Fi “to help him bring back jazz at the club level.”

“At the time, in my estimation, jazz truly was dead in Omaha,” she says. “Love’s Jazz was doing a little smooth jazz and you had great shows at the Holland, but you can’t develop a jazz audience at $35 and $65 a ticket. So we came up with a concept of doing shows where Curly and company perform jazz and tackle history he thought otherwise would never be told. He’s really a big believer if kids don’t see it, they can’t aspire to play it—and then we’ll never turn this around.”

Dussault committed “to celebrate the history with Curly and guys he grew up with that had a pretty important impact on the canon of jazz, blues, R&B, even rock. We brought back his friends. We underwrote the shows and we were full almost every time.”

Make Believe captures interviews and performances of Martin and guest musicians. The result is an archive of artists who lived North O’s jazz and blues past.

Filling the Void

Recent standing-room-only Holland performances confirm what Martin and Dussault already knew. “There’s an audience for this music—but you have to reintroduce it,” she says. “Omaha has to work on audience development.” She adds that there has been serious neglect of the scene, not just in Omaha but around the country. “It needs to be respected, coddled, and brought back.”

Omaha Performing Arts executive director Joan Squires saw the same void. Filling that gap became the mission of its Holland Jazz Series and 1200 Club.

“Nobody was presenting, in any real consistent way, the major touring jazz artists and ensembles here, and we felt it was important we do it,” Squires recalls. “Jazz is an important art form and something we’re very committed to. We do it not just for what’s on the stage but also for the education components the artists bring to our community.”

OPA’s jazz program launched in 2007. The main stage concert hall series features “a mix of very established jazz masters and renowned artists along with up-and-coming talent,” she says.

Jazz on the Green fell under OPA’s domain when Joslyn Art Museum sought someone to take it over.

“We jumped at the chance, because it’s certainly a big part of our mission and it’s a beloved series,” Squires says. “Midtown Crossing’s opening made for a perfect location. All the pieces came together to take that series to a whole new level. We’ll regularly get 8,000 to 10,000 people at a performance. It’s extraordinary.”

Omaha saxophonist Matt Wallace, who toured with Maynard Ferguson and played the prestigious Blue Note and Birdland, likes the city’s new jazz landscape.

“In general, I think the scene is very healthy right now between the players we’re producing and the available venues. The whole scene depends on schools doing well and having places to play. It’s very systemic. If one part is missing, there’s an issue. I’m very encouraged by what’s happening.”

He’s impressed by The Jewell, which opened last fall.

“What happens with most clubs is they get one of two things right—either it sounds great or it looks great. This club actually got all of it right. Another thing I like is that when you walk in you get a history of artists who played at the Dreamland—Nat King Cole, Dinah Washington, Duke Ellington.”

Jewell owner Brian McKenna’s club is a conduit to Omaha’s jazz past.

“There are two stories here,” McKenna says. “There’s the generation of Curly Martin and the previous generation of Preston Love. Each became enchanted with the sounds and players of their eras. They met the artists who came through and ended up playing with them.”

Back in the Day

Martin and his buddies learned to play jazz on the North Side, jamming alongside big-time touring artists. They became respected industry journeymen. Martin has brought some—Stemsy Hunter, Calvin Keys, Ron Beck, and Wali Ali—back to gig with him in Omaha.

North 24th Street landmark Allen’s Showcase, Martin says, “was a musicians’ hangout. It was just about music, period. You went to the Showcase for one reason only—to hear the best of the best. That’s what black music was about. That was the place for the players. The Sunday jam session was notorious. It went from 10 in the morning till 1 the next morning. You had time to play, go home, change clothes, eat, come back.”

The Dreamland Ballroom was where people went to see the major artists at the time. “We knew it as a blues place—Little Richard, Etta James, BB King…You never could dance in the damn ballroom because it was packed tight,” Martin says. “You know where us young musicians were at—right up to the stage looking up.”

“That’s how we met ‘em all. We had a chance to sit-in and play with them.…Later on, when we got 20, 21, they remembered us. That’s how we got gigs.”

Once musicians sufficiently honed their craft here, they left to back big-name artists on major concert tours and hit records. They found success as sidemen, session players, composers, producers, and music directors. Some, like Buddy Miles, became headliners.

The same scenario unfolded a generation earlier at the Dreamland, Club Harlem, Carnation Ballroom, and McGill’s Blue Room. Anna Mae Winburn, Preston Love, and Wynonie Harris broke out that way.

On the North O scene, mostly black talent played in front of integrated audiences on the strip dubbed The Deuce. Driving riffs, hot licks, and soulful voices filled myriad live music spots.

“Everybody was coming north,” Martin says.

“When I came up, we were not leaving Omaha for New York or Los Angeles. There was that much work. There were that many great musicians and venues. Then there were all the cats coming back and forth through Omaha. We were seeing the best in the world…why go anywhere?”

An infrastructure supported the scene in terms of black hotels, rooming houses, and restaurants. A&A Records was “a kick-ass music store with eight listening booths.”

“We had all that going on,” Martin says. “I’d come out of my house every morning and hear music on every corner. It was a fairytale, man. At night, you had to dress up—suit and tie, shoes shined. It was classy. Twenty-fourth and Lake was like being on Broadway. It was like that back in the day.”

Further making the scene special were clubs such as Backstreet, Apex Lounge, The Black Orchid, and The Green Light. At Off Beat Supper Club emcees introduced Cotton Club-like revues and floor shows. “It was killing,” Martin says. “It was the most popular black club in North Omaha.”

After-hours joints added another choice for late nights out. High stakes games unfolded at the Tuxedo Pool Hall. The Ritz and Lothrop movie theaters and social halls provided more entertainment options.

“North Omaha was a one-stop shop when it came to music. There was more to it than just jazz. That was just part of it. The history of North Omaha is not simple at all, especially about the music. There was just tons of music.”

And transcendent talent.

From Gene McDaniels hitting gold with “A Hundred Pounds of Clay” to Lalomie Washburn writing Chaka Khan’s mega-hit “I’m Every Woman,” it’s clear the talent was there.

“Cats getting record deals with Chess Records in Chicago. I can go on and on,” Martin says. “They were hometown stars in the ‘hood—and we all grew up together.”

Restoring What Was Lost

In the ensuing decades, clubs closed and the economy dwindled.

As the North O scene waned, new metro artists emerged—Dave Stryker, Jorge Nila, Dereck Higgins, Steve Raybine, and the Potash Twins.

There were still veterans around for up-and-comers to learn from.

Matt Wallace learned under Luigi Waites. “Playing with older, more experienced guys your game has to come up—there’s just no way around it,” Wallace says. “I try carrying that on.”

Drummer Gary Foster is grateful to his mentors. “I had so many experiences of people taking their time with me, from Bobby Griffo to Charles Gamble to Luigi to Preston, and Preston’s sons Norman and Richie. They were very open.”

Bobby Griffo, aka Shabaka, “was just a prime mover in the North Omaha modern jazz scene. Anybody that was anybody played with him,” Foster says.

Griffo ran the Omaha Music School and led the big band Arkestra that included prime players Timmy Renfro, Mark Luebbe, Gamble, and Foster.

Omaha’s Jazz Scene Hung On

“The Showcase was still going. The Howard Street Tavern had Tuesday night jam sessions. Luigi normally had a night there (and at Mr. Toad’s). A lot of people came in to play,” Foster recalls. “Jack DeJohnette’s band. The Johnny Otis Revue. Dizzy Gillespie and Earl Hines came to town and did a jam session at Howard Street.”

“That stuff went on all the time. The big one was at Kilgore’s. Chick Corea was in town to play the Music Hall. He wanted to know if there was anything going on and we took him to Kilgore’s. He sat in all night playing drums. He didn’t even touch the keyboard.”

Foster says jazz could also be heard at places like The Gaslight and Julio’s.

“And there were still all kinds of little after-hours clubs. I remember one down by the stockyards. I walked in there with my drums—this young white boy with all these black musicians in an all-black club. When the guys sitting at the bar turned around, their coats opened and they were all carrying pistols. They were like, ‘Don’t worry, you’re with the band, you’re cool, you don’t have to worry about anything here.’”

But things slowed to a crawl from the 1990s on.

“Clubs stopped hiring the caliber of jazz artists they once did,” he says. “There were always good local players playing, but it was just a niche thing. Nobody was really making any money at it. We turned to other music to keep gigging. You had to do what you had to do to make it. We played jazz because we loved it.”

The same 10 jazz players played all the gigs. “That’s why I moved to New York,” Foster says. Stryker, Nila, and Karrin Allyson preceded him there.

Climbing Back

Foster is glad the jazz scene has picked up.

Mark’s Bistro owner Mark Pluhacek helped feed the resurgence with a regular jazz program at Jambo Cat beneath his eatery. Though it gained a following, that wasn’t enough to prevent its closing.

Chuck Kilgore, a musician and former club owner, played at and booked Jambo Cat, which he called “the perfect venue.” Even perfect wasn’t good enough.

The truth, Kilgore says, is that few entrepreneurs are willing to risk an investment when there’s “almost certain” small returns.

“Jazz is mostly subsidized these days the way symphonic music is,” Pluhacek says. “It’s underwritten for it to survive. It’s not what people are listening to in huge volumes, so it has to be supported in other ways.”

Pluhacek enjoyed Jambo’s run while it lasted.

“It all came together. It was wonderful. We realize the importance of it. We hope the energy for jazz just grows and gets better.”

Hope for the Future

Besides the Holland and Jewell, other outlets for jazz include the Ozone Lounge, Omaha Lounge, Havana Garage, Harney Street Tavern, and Mr. Toad’s.

Education is also key to engaging an audience.

LJAC hopes to have artists at The Jewell work with elementary school students, and OPA is introducing the genre to pre-schoolers through Jazz at Lincoln Center’s WeBop program. Another facet of cultivating audiences is radio jazz programming. Artists still depend on air play.

“What’s changed is musicians’ ability to get their music out there,” KIOS-FM jazz host Mike Jacobs says. “We get a lot of music produced and marketed by musicians themselves. The major labels have gotten away from doing straight-ahead jazz. A lot of artists produce a hybrid jazz-pop sound. They’re like gateway artists to the classic stuff.”

Jacobs’ KIOS colleague Christopher Cooke is cautiously optimistic The Jewell and other jazz spaces will re-energize things here. He hopes to one day see a “real summer jazz festival in Omaha.”

Meanwhile, Martin helps to build appreciation for the past and a foothold for the future. “It’s about the music coming first. I’ve been blessed and I have to pass it on,” he says.

“Curly was around for a scene that doesn’t exist anymore,” Carson says, “and he’s still connected to the people who made that music…No one is putting him and those dudes on the pedestal. But they’re world-class musicians. They’re clearly exceptional talents.”

Martin wants North O’s renaissance to be informed by what went before.

“How you going to know what we need, when you don’t know what we had?”


This article was printed in the July/August 2019 edition of Omaha Magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

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An Omaha Star: Phyllis Hicks – The Publisher & the Newspaper She Never Meant to Run

March 10, 2019 Leave a comment

An Omaha Star: Phyllis Hicks

The Publisher & the Newspaper She Never Meant to Run

by Leo Adam Biga

Originally appeared in the March-April 2019 edition of Omaha Magazine (http://omahamagazine.com/articles/an-omaha-star-phyllis-hicks/)

 

 

 

 

When the story of the city’s longest-running African-American-owned newspaper, The Omaha Star, is written, three women will dominate its 80-year narrative.

Founding publisher Mildred Brown ran the ship from 1938 until her death in 1989. Her niece Marguerita Washington (a career educator), who spent time working for her aunt growing up, succeeded her. Phyllis Hicks joined the paper in 2005 and took over more and more of its operations after Washington fell ill. Upon Washington’s 2016 death, Hicks officially became publisher and managing editor; in truth, she had been running things for some time.

Hicks—the last survivor of this troika of black women journalists—never intended getting so deeply involved with the paper. Brown was only an acquaintance and Hicks’ association with the Star was limited to reading and submitting news items to it. She only joined the staff as a favor to her mother, who was close to Washington. Hicks studied journalism in school, but besides writing occasional press releases for her work in the public and private sectors (including her coaching of the Stepping Saints drill team), she had nothing to do with the Fourth Estate.

Fate had other plans, and thus Hicks, like Brown and Washington before her, became the matriarchal face of the paper. She did it her way, too. Lacking the entrepreneurial and sartorial flair of Brown, Hicks nevertheless managed attracting enough advertisers to keep the Star afloat through troubled economic times and declining ad revenues and subscriptions. Without the publishing and academic background of Washington, Hicks still found ways to keep the paper relevant for today’s readers.

After more than a decade with the paper, Hicks—who turns 76 on March 7—is looking to step away from the paper due to her own declining health. She broke her ankle in 2017, and then, last year went to the hospital to be treated for pneumonia; she was discharged with a dysfunctional kidney requiring dialysis.

She is eager for someone to carry the Star torch forward. As this issue of Omaha Magazine went to press, a management transition involving the Mildred D. Brown Memorial Study Center was in progress.

Whatever the paper’s future, Hicks is glad to have been part of its legacy of strong black women. That legacy extends to her late mother, aunts, and grandmother (Emma Lee Agee-Sullivan)—all independent achievers from whom she drew much inspiration.

When Agee-Sullivan was young, she was a member of the church pastored by the Rev. Earl Little (Malcolm X’s father). Agee-Sullivan was with the Little family when a lynch mob came looking for Earl Little. The family hid him and covered for him, and the Littles fled Nebraska the next day. As an adult, Hicks says, Agee-Sullivan was active in the Baptist church and started the state’s first licensed, black-owned home daycare.

Hicks had aunts who worked in finance and another who was a championship golfer (who would have gone professional “if she had come at another time”), she says, adding that her paternal grandfather, the Rev. J. P. Mosley Sr., led a demonstration to integrate swimming pools in Chillicothe, Missouri, in 1954, and “built Mount Nebo Baptist Church from the ground up” in Omaha.

When the challenge of the Star or anything else presented itself, she was ready. “I just did it because it had to be done,” Hicks says.

She followed the path laid out by other “black women taking the leadership role.”

At a time when few black women owned businesses, Brown launched the Star only a year after moving to town. She originally worked for the city’s other African-American paper, The Guide. She left its employment for her startup, which competed against The Guide for advertisers and readers. The Star soon won out thanks to her entrepreneurial savvy and not-taking-no-for-an-answer grit. The publisher made her paper a bastion for civil rights and community pride.

Following Brown’s death in 1989, Washington took command. By the early 2000s, the
paper struggled.

Meanwhile, Hicks’ mother, Juanita, befriended Washington. When Juanita fell ill, Washington helped care for her to allow Hicks to manage the Stepping Saints. Then, when Juanita’s house got flooded, she stayed with Washington for six weeks.

“They kind of adopted each other and threw me in the mix,” Hicks says.

Hicks was retired but, at the urging of her mother, she offered to assist Washington at the Star. Hicks soon took on editorial and business duties.

“I went to do a little marketing for Marguerita, and I’ve been there ever since,” she says. “I discovered there was a lot of help she needed. The paper was in dire straits. And I just started doing some of everything.”

Along the way, Hicks and Washington grew close. “It was a growing relationship that became more of a personal one than a business one,” she says.

Together, they formed the Mildred D. Brown Memorial Study Center as a fundraising and scholarship vehicle.

As Washington’s health failed, Hicks became her caregiver and eventually power of attorney. By the time Washington died of multiple malignant brain tumors in 2016, Hicks transitioned the paper from a weekly to a biweekly as a cost-savings move. She also got the paper’s archives digitized online.

Hicks continued running the paper, she says, because “I just felt an obligation. When I take on something, I try to see it through.”

Woodcut of Phyllis Hicks by Watie White

The Star is believed to be the nation’s oldest African-American paper owned and operated by women. Through the Great Depression, the late ’60s riots, the 2008 economic collapse, the death of publishers, and declining print ad revenue, it has never ceased publication.

Hicks admires how Washington took up the mantle after Mildred Brown died.

“She wanted the paper to go on as a legacy to Mildred because Mildred put her all into the paper. Plus, Marguerita felt the paper needed to be in the community to allow the black community a voice. She felt the newspaper was another way to educate people.

“She made the ultimate sacrifice and put her life on hold to keep somebody else’s dream alive,” Hicks says.

With Washington and Brown as her models, she ensured the Star’s survival.

“I take satisfaction in knowing I kept it from going under because it was close to going under,” she says. “With some personal sacrifices, I’ve been able to keep the doors open and pay people’s salaries. I paid off allThe Omaha Star bills. There were several years of back taxes. All that’s been caught up to date.”

Hicks came to believe, as Brown and Washington did, the Star serves an important role in its “ability to tell it like it is in the community, without it having to be politically correct.”

Just don’t expect crime reporting.

“I’ve tried to keep the paper in the light that Marguerita and Mildred did in positive news,” she says. “We don’t report who got killed, we don’t report crime, we don’t report any of that, because there’s a mess of that being reported already. What we try to do is paint a bright picture of what’s going on in the community—people’s accomplishments. We try to put information out there that builds the community up as well as inspires the community.”

The Star’s long been home to strong voices—from Charlie Washington and Preston Love Sr. to Ernie Chambers and Walter Brooks—calling for change. For many black Omahans, including those living elsewhere, it remains a main conduit to their shared community.

Hicks wishes more young people used the paper as a resource and recognized its role in fighting injustice and championing black self-determination.

“It’s a legacy for them,” she says. “It’s a part of this community’s history, and it’s a vehicle for them to tell their stories. We invite young people to submit stories.”

The Star intersects with young people through internships it offers students and scholarships granted by the Study Center. Engaging with community youth has been a priority for Hicks for years.

Long before joining the Star, Hicks made her community mark as co-founder and director of the Salem Baptist Church Stepping Saints drill team. The team was originally organized in 1966 to perform at a single event. But Saints dancers and drummers wanted something permanent, so the group became a fixture in area parades and at Disneyland, Disney World, Knott’s Berry Farm, and many other attractions across the nation.

Hicks says, the last time she counted, the Saints had performed in 38 states and some 2,000 youths had cycled through the team’s ranks over time. Some veteran Saints have seen their children and grandkids participate, making it a multigenerational tradition.

The Saints celebrated 50 years in 2017. The team is still going strong. Even though Hicks no longer takes an active hand in things, she’s still the matriarch.

Just as she never meant for the Saints to be a long-term commitment, her Omaha Star gig turned into one. Her promise-keeping may be her enduring legacy.

“If I say I’m going to do something, then I’m going to try to see it to the end,” she says.

Hicks wants the paper to remain black-owned and managed and based in North Omaha, where its red brick building (at 2216 N. 24th St.) has landmark status on the National Register of Historic Places.


Visit theomahastar.com for more information.

This article first appeared in the March/April 2019 edition of 60PLUS in Omaha MagazineTo receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

Commemorating Black History Month – Links to North Omaha stories (Part IV of four-part series)


Commemorating Black History Month

Links to North Omaha stories from 1998 through 2018

 

 
Articles on social justice, civil rights, race, history, faith, family, community, business, politics. education, art, music, theater, film, culture, et cetera

A weekly four-part series

Final week: Part IV – Soul food and soul sports

 

https://leoadambiga.com/2019/01/16/the-long-road-to…ear-as-a-bluejay

Charles Hall’s Fair Deal Cafe | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

 
https://leoadambiga.com/2012/04/10/onepeachof-a-pitcherpeaches…
 

 

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase: Next up – short films by Jason Fischer on Tuesday, March 5 at 6 p.m.


Local Black Filmmakers Showcase

A February-March 2019 film festival @ College of Saint Mary, 7000 Mercy Road

6 p.m. | Gross Auditorium in Hill Macaluso Hall

Featuring screen gems by Omaha’s own Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer

Support the work of these African-American community-based cinema artists

 

Next up – three short films by Jason Fischer

Screening on Tuesday, March 5:

•The art film “I Do Not Use” pairs searing, symbolic images to poet Frank O’Neal’s incendiary words.

•The documentary “Whitney Young: To Become Great” uses the civil rights leader’s life as a model for kids and adults to investigate what it takes to be great.

•And the award-winning “Out of Framed: Unseen Poverty in the Heartland” documents people living on the margins in Omaha.

 

Screenings start at 6 p.m.

Followed by Q & A with the filmmaker moderated by Leo Adam Biga.

Tickets and parking are free and all films are open to the public.

For more information, call 402-399-2365.

Still to come – a screening of Omowale Akintunde’s award-winning documentary “An Inaugural Ride to Freedom” about a group of Omahans who traveled by bus to the first Obama inauguration. Plus a bonus documentary on the second Obama inauguration. Followed by Q&A with the filmmaker moderated by Leo Adam Biga. Date and time to be determined. Watch for posts announcing this wrap-up program in the Local Black Filmmakers Showcase.

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase continues tonight with “Wigger”

February 28, 2019 Leave a comment

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase featuring screen gems by Omaha’s own Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer

Support the work of these African-American community-based cinema artists

 

February-March  2019

College of Saint Mary

6 p.m. | Gross Auditorium in Hill Macaluso Hall

The work of award-winning Omaha filmmakers Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer highlight this four-day festival at College of Saint Mary.

 

Next up:

“Wigger” (2010)

From writer-director-producer:

Omowale Akintunde

 

Screening tonight – Thursday, February 28 @ 6 p.m. 

Followed by a Q&A with flmmaker Omowale Akintunde. 

Moderated by Omaha fllm author-journalist-blogger Leo Adam Biga.

 

Shot entirely in North Omaha, “Wigger” explores racism through the prism of a white dude whose strong identification with black culture ensnares and empowers him amidst betrayal and tragedy.”Wigger” is a spellbinding urban drama, which chronicles the life of a young, White, male (Brandon) who totally emulates and immerses himself in African American life and culture. Brandon is an aspiring R&B singer struggling to overcome the confines of a White racist, impoverished family headed by a neo-Nazi father who is absolutely appalled by his son’s total identification with Black culture. Additionally, he is oft times reminded of his position of privilege by virtue of being White in a White, racist society despite his adamant efforts to transcend “Whiteness”, institutionalized racism, and find a place for himself in a world in which he rejects Whiteness but is not always fully embraced by African American culture. Ultimately, this is the story of a young White, inner-city, male caught up in an emotional, psychological, experiential, and racial “Catch 22” determined to be granted acceptance in the life and culture with which he chooses to identify.

Wigger Poster  

The Festival continues on Tuesday, March 5 with  three short films by Jason Fischer taking center stage. The art film “I Do Not Use” pairs searing, symbolic images to poet Frank O’Neal’s incendiary words. The documentary “Whitney Young: To Become Great” uses the civil rights leader’s life as a model for kids and adults to investigate what it takes to be great. “Out of Framed: Unseen Poverty in the Heartland”documents people living on the margins in Omaha.

 

NOTE: The March 5 Jason Fischer program was originally scheduled for February 25 but was postponed due to inclement weather.

The February 26 program featuring Omowale Akintunde’s Emmy-award winning documentary “An Inaugural Ride to Freedom” was also postponed due to weather and will be rescheduled at a date to be determined later.

 

All films begin at 6 p.m. and will be screened in Gross Auditorium in Hill Macaluso Hall at College of Saint Mary, 7000 Mercy Road.

A Q & A with the filmmaker follows each screening. 

Tickets and parking are free and all films are open to the public.

For more information, call 402-399-2365.

 

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase featuring screen gems by Omaha’s own Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer

February 26, 2019 Leave a comment

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase featuring screen gems by Omaha’s own Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer

Support the work of these African-American community-based artists

 

February-March  2019

College of Saint Mary

6 p.m. | Gross Auditorium in Hill Macaluso Hall

The work of award-winning Omaha filmmakers Omowale Akintunde and Jason Fischer highlight this four-day festival at College of Saint Mary.

On Tuesday February 26, Akitnunde’s “An Inaugural Ride to Freedom” charts a trip Nebraskans made to D.C. for Obama’s historic first inauguration. On Wednesday, February 27, it’s the world premiere of Akintunde’s television pilot “It Takes a Village,” which turns black situation comedy on its head. On Thursday, February 28, his impressive dramatic feature debut “Wigger,”shot entirely in North Omaha, explores racism through the prism of a white dude whose strong identification with black culture ensnares and empowers him amidst betrayal and tragedy.

On Tuesday, March 5 three short films by Fischer take center stage. The art film “I Do Not Use” pairs searing, symbolic images to poet Frank O’Neal’s incendiary words. The documentary “Whitney Young: To Become Great” uses the civil rights leader’s life as a model for kids and adults to investigate what it takes to be great. “Out of Framed: Unseen Poverty in the Heartland”documents people living on the margins in Omaha.

Screenings start at 6 p.m. Q &As follow the February 27. February 28 and March 5 showings.

All films begin at 6 p.m. and will be screened in Gross Auditorium at College of Saint Mary, 7000 Mercy Road 68106.

Tickets and parking are free and all films are open to the public.

For more information, call 402-399-2365.

Local Black Filmmakers Showcase

Tuesday, February 26th

“An Inaugural Ride to Freedom”

Wednesday, February 27th

Premier screening:

“It Takes a Village”

Director Q&A with Omowale Akintunde

February 28th

“Wigger”

Director Q&A with Omowale Akintunde

Tuesday, March 5

Short Films (originally scheduled for Feb. 25)

“I Do Not Use”

“Whitney Young To Become Great”

“Out of Frame: Unseen Poverty in the Heartland”

Director Q&A with Jason R. Fischer

Commemorating Black History Month – Links to North Omaha stories (Part III of four-part series)

February 26, 2019 Leave a comment

Commemorating Black History Month

Links to North Omaha stories from 1998 to 2019

 

Articles on social justice, civil rights, race, history, faith, family, community, business, politics. education, art, music, theater, film, culture, et cetera

A weekly four-part series

This week: Part III – History, art, music, theater, film, culture, entertainment, society

 

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/11/25/cathy-hughes-for…g-the-status-quo

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/12/12/as-screen-vetera…-big-career-move

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/11/berthas-battle/ ‎

Burden of Dreams: The Trials of Omaha’s Black Museum | Leo Adam …

https://leoadambiga.com/…/burden-of-dreams-the-trials-of-omaha’s-black museum/

Great Plains Black History Museum Asks for Public Input on its …

https://leoadambiga.com/…/great-plains-black-history-museum-asks-for- public-input-on-its-latest-evolution/‎

Long and Winding Saga of the Great Plains Black History Museum …

https://leoadambiga.com/…/long-and-winding-saga-of-the-great-plains-black- history-museum-takes-a-new-turn-2/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/04/30/omahas-sweet-six…master-battalion

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/18/the-tuskegee-airmen/

https://leoadambiga.com/2019/02/09/omahas-jazz-past…ge-at-the-jewell/

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/11/25/funny-yet-seriou…ber-ruffin-story

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/12/08/putting-it-on-th…in-late-night-tv/

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/04/30/north-omaha-rupt…f-playfest-drama/

https://leoadambiga.com/2018/04/24/stage-screen-sta…e-omaha-symphony

soul sisters – The Reader

http://thereader.com/visual-art/soul_sisters/

Camille Metoyer Moten | Omaha Magazine

http://omahamagazine.com/articles/tag/camille-metoyer-moten/

Camille Metoyer Moten: With a song in her heart | Leo Adam …

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/12/26/camille-metoyer-moten-with-a

Art imitates life as themes in play cut closely for its stars – The Reader

http://thereader.com/visual-art/art_imitates_life_as_themes_in_play_cut_closely_for_its_stars/

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/02/18/blacks-of-distinction-2/

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/04/01/blacks-of-distinction-ii/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/05/after-night-of-v…s-venue’s-future/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/11/20/finding-forefath…limpse-of-future/

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/09/actor-kelcey-wat…es-of-separation/

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/04/22/john-beasley-living-his-dream/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/06/john-beasley-making-his-stand

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/02/01/john-beasley-act…nt-believability

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/03/john-beasley-and…kshop-and-beyond

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/30/tired-of-being-t…-beasley-theater

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/18/get-your-jitney-on

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/05/29/polishing-gem-be…gem-of-the-ocean

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/14/what-happens-to-…aisin-in-the-sun

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/10/04/michael-beasley-…-steel-magnolias/

Life comes full circle for singer Carol Rogers | Leo Adam …

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/08/28/life-comes-full-circle-for

Sisters of song: Kathy Tyree connects with Ella Fitzgerald …

http://thereader.com/visual-art/sisters_of_song_kathy_tyree_connects_with_ella_fitzgerald/

Black Women in Music | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/11/black-women-in-music

Now Wasn’t That a Time? Helen Jones Woods and the …

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/04/29/17

Kia Corthron | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/category/kia-corthron

Bomb Girl Zedeka Poindexter Draws on Family, Food and …

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/03/11/zedeka-poindexter-draws-on..

Lit Fest Brings Author Carleen Brice Back Home Flush with …

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/07/02/lit-fest-brings-author-carleen

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/10/26/novel’s-mother-d…it-to-the-screen

Wanda Ewing Exhibit: Bougie is as Bougie Does | Leo Adam …

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/12/08/wanda-ewing-exhibit-bougie-is

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/06/17/color-me-black-a…ications-of-race/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/22/frederick-browns…ing-on-of-legacy

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/28/artist-bernard-s…-revival-worship/

Jana Murrell: Working Towards a New Standard of Beauty …

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/07/04/jana-murrell-working-towards-a

Gospel Playwright Llana Smith Enjoys Her Big Mama’s Time

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/07/gospel-playwright-llana-smith

Quiana Smith’s Dream Time Takes Her to Regional, Off …

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/01/23/quiana-smiths-dream-time-2

Jill Scott Interview | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/08/08/interview-with-jill-scott

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/05/a-woman-under-the-influence/

Crowns | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/tag/crowns/‎

Tiffany White-Welchen delivers memorable performance in …

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/10/14/tiffany-white-welchen-delivers

Enchantress “LadyMac” Gets Down | Leo Adam Biga’s My …

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/21/enchantress-ladymac-gets-down

Preston Love, His Voice Will Not Be Stilled | Leo Adam Biga’s My …

https://leoadambiga.com/…/preston-love-his-voice-will-not-be-stilled/‎

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/05/05/preston-love-a-t…late-hepcat-king/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/03/mr-saturday-night

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/03/omaha-blues-and-…end-preston-love

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/03/preston-love-192…ed-at-everything

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/01/hard-times-ring-…uthor-laura-love/

https://leoadambiga.com/2013/04/27/laura-love-omaha…r-gal-comes-home/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/12/19/preston-love-jr-…e-man-chautauqua

Cool Cat Billy and the Sportin’ Life | Leo Adam Biga’s My Inside Stories

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/07/01/sportin-life/‎

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/06/18/puttin-on-the-ritz/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/08/28/soon-come-nevill…hing-north-omaha

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/12/27/gabrielle-union-…-from-the-camera

Gabrielle Union having it all between her own series, new …

http://thereader.com/news/gabrielle_union_having_it_all_between_her_own_series_new_film_producing_mar/

https://leoadambiga.com/2012/09/29/gabrielle-union-…ary-half-the-sky/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/21/the-gabrielle-union-chronicles

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/08/21/gabrielle-union-a-star-is-born

Dope actress Yolonda Ross is nothing but versatile – from …

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/10/18/dope-actress-yolonda-ross-is

Yolonda Ross adds writer-director to actress credits – The …

http://thereader.com/visual-art/yolonda_ross_adds_writer-director_to_actress_credits/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/06/21/yolonda-ross-takes-it-to-the-limit

https://leoadambiga.com/2015/09/13/tim-christian-ch…film-in-nebraska

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/11/29/vincent-alstons-…nd-love-all-over

https://leoadambiga.com/2016/03/09/master-of-many-m…ms-jason-fischer/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/01/an-inner-city-ex…range-of-stories/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/09/01/art-from-the-streets/

https://leoadambiga.com/2011/07/20/omowale-akintund…new-cinema-voice/

https://leoadambiga.com/2010/05/21/deconstructing-w…ost-racial-world

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